Cornell University Press Authors' blogs

Top 10 Author Blog Posts: June 2020

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Every month, our authors write blog posts on different subjects, often related to current events, that we highlight on our website. In these posts, they use their expertise and research to provide us with new ways of thinking about what’s happening in the world.

In case you missed them, here is a roundup of the authors and the 10 most-viewed blogs of June 2020. Enjoy!

1) Pandemics, Hajj, and Politics, by Eileen Kane

The Covid-19 pandemic has got us thinking about what happens when a pandemic intersects with religion and politics. And, how a pandemic can activate the fault lines of our precarious coexistence and reshape political possibilities. Read more…

2) Bangladesh’s Women Entrepreneurs Rally against COVID-19, by Juli Huang 

I recently joined a COVID-19-themed Zoom session with 25 women entrepreneurs living in rural parts of Bangladesh who are trained to provide information-and technology-based services to village residents. Read more…

3) The Afterlives of Empire in Contemporary China, by Benno Weiner

At first blush, recent events in China’s far northwest region of Xinjiang and in Hong Kong off its southeast coast might seem to have little in common. Citizens in Hong Kong have taken to the streets to protest the erosion of the former British colony’s special rights, while in Xinjiang the state has implemented an unprecedented regime of securitization, surveillance, mass imprisonment, and forced labor intended to erode the cultural identities of indigenous Muslim communities and assimilate them into the Chinese national body. Read more…

4) The Logics of Anti-blackness Undergird Every Mode of Injustice We Seek to Remediate, by Jodi Rios

In the wake of the brutal murder of George Floyd, renewed calls to defund or even abolish formal police departments are gaining momentum. If successful, these efforts could save countless black people from state-sanctioned violence and death. While this is a very obvious and visible place to start in the fight against anti-blackness, my research has shown that every time one racist system is dismantled, another tends to pop up to replace it. Read more…

5) Faith in—and within—a Troubled World, by Doug Feldmann

For the majority of my adult life, I have thrived on routine and predictability. Devoted to clock and calendar, I approached each day as a series of tasks to be checked off —whether the day was spent on campus or on vacation. Like Benjamin Franklin’s self-assessment of his Thirteen Virtues, most nights I rated myself on my accomplishment of each objective as I laid in bed. Read more…

6) Home Care Workers and the Need for Alliances, by Cynthia Cranford

Home care workers are at the bottom of the health care hierarchy alongside elderly and disabled people. Home care workers assist people with crucial daily activities like bathing, eating, and keeping a clean house. Yet, they work in temporary and part-time jobs with low pay, few benefits and, too often, are disrespected. Read more…

7) A Message on the Aftermath of the Murder of George Floyd, by Rodney A. Smolla

Dear Students of the Widener Delaware Law School:

I address you tonight as your Dean, as the nation roils in the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd. Read more…

8) The Rhetoric of Religious Freedom in Conservative Christian Activism, by Lauren Turek 

The world is understandably focused on the COVID-19 crisis right now, as deaths mount and leaders struggle to respond with effective political, economic, and public health policies. In the United States, the slow and disorganized federal response has stymied efforts to implement widespread testing. Read more…

9) “There is Death in the Pot!”: Consumer Activism and Slave-Labor Goods, by Julie L. Holcomb 

One hundred years ago, the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment granted women the right to vote. Ratification marked the culmination of decades of activism by men and women. Many of those activists were also abolitionists, including Lucretia Mott, Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Harriet Tubman, and Frederick Douglass. Read more…

10) The Oil Wars Myth and International Conflict, by Emily Meierding

Last month, the COVID-19 pandemic caused global oil consumption to fall by almost 30 million barrels per day, from its previous high of 100 million barrels. Oil demand is not expected to fully recover by the end of 2020. Some analysts predict that it will never return to pre-pandemic levels. In that case, the world will experience a permanent oil glut. There are many advantages to cheap, abundant oil. Is one of them the end of international oil wars? Read more…


Also of interest:

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