Results of the search for "Cornell University Press" 
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Strong Governments, Precarious Workers
Labor Market Policy in the Era of Liberalization
Philip Rathgeb
Why do some European welfare states protect unemployed and inadequately employed workers ("outsiders") from economic uncertainty better than others? Philip Rathgeb’s study of labor market policy change in three somewhat-similar small states—Austria, Denmark, and Sweden—explores this fundamental question. He does so by examining the distribution...



Land-Grant Colleges and Popular Revolt
The Origins of the Morrill Act and the Reform of Higher Education
Nathan M. Sorber
The land-grant ideal at the foundation of many institutions of higher learning promotes the sharing of higher education, science, and technical knowledge with local communities. This democratic and utilitarian mission, Nathan M. Sorber shows, has always been subject to heated debate regarding the motivations and goals of land-grant...



Shaping a City
Ithaca, New York, a Developer's Perspective
Mack Travis
Picture your downtown vacant, boarded up, while the malls surrounding your city are thriving. What would you do?In 1974 the politicians, merchants, community leaders, and business and property owners, of Ithaca, New York, joined together to transform main street into a pedestrian mall. Cornell University began an Industrial Research Park to...



Taming Japan's Deflation
The Debate over Unconventional Monetary Policy
Gene Park, Saori N. Katada, Giacomo Chiozza, Yoshiko Kojo
Bolder economic policy could have addressed the persistent bouts of deflation in post-bubble Japan, write Gene Park, Saori N. Katada, Giacomo Chiozza, and Yoshiko Kojo in Taming Japan's Deflation. Despite warnings from economists, intense political pressure, and well-articulated unconventional policy options to address this problem, Japan's...



Empire of Hope
The Sentimental Politics of Japanese Decline
David Leheny
Empire of Hope asks how emotions become meaningful in political life. In a diverse array of cases from recent Japanese history, David Leheny shows how sentimental portrayals of the nation and its global role reflect a durable story of hopefulness about the country's postwar path. From the medical treatment of conjoined Vietnamese children...



The Perraults
A Family of Letters in Early Modern France
Oded Rabinovitch
In The Perraults, Oded Rabinovitch takes the fascinating eponymous literary and scientific family as an entry point into the complex and rapidly changing world of early modern France. Today, the Perraults are best remembered for their canonical fairy tales, such as "Cinderella" and "Puss in Boots," most often attributed to Charles Perrault, one...



The One, Other, and Only Dickens
Garrett Stewart
In The One, Other, and Only Dickens, Garrett Stewart casts new light on those delirious wrinkles of wording that are one of the chief pleasures of Dickens’s novels but that go regularly unnoticed in Dickensian criticism: the linguistic infrastructure of his textured prose. Stewart, in effect, looks over the reader’s shoulder in shared...



Urban Ornithology
150 Years of Birds in New York City
P. A. Buckley, Walter Sedwitz, William J. Norse, John Kieran
Urban Ornithology is the first quantitative historical analysis of any New York City natural area’s birdlife and spans the century and a half from 1872 to 2016. Only Manhattan’s Central and Brooklyn’s Prospect Parks have preliminary species lists, not revised since 1967, and the last book examining the birdlife of the entire New York City area...



Dark Pasts
Changing the State's Story in Turkey and Japan
Jennifer M. Dixon
Over the past two decades, many states have heard demands that they recognize and apologize for historic wrongs. Such calls have not elicited uniform or predictable responses. While some states have apologized for past crimes, others continue to silence, deny, and relativize dark pasts. What explains the tremendous variation in how states deal...



Persistence of Folly
On the Origins of German Dramatic Literature
Joel B. Lande
Joel B. Lande’s Persistence of Folly challenges the accepted account of the origins of German theater by focusing on the misunderstood figure of the fool, whose spontaneous and impish jest captivated audiences, critics, and playwrights from the late sixteenth through the early nineteenth century. Lande radically expands the scope of literary...



Atomic Assurance
The Alliance Politics of Nuclear Proliferation
Alexander Lanoszka
Do alliances curb efforts by states to develop nuclear weapons? Atomic Assurance looks at what makes alliances sufficiently credible to prevent nuclear proliferation; how alliances can break down and so encourage nuclear proliferation; and whether security guarantors like the United States can use alliance ties to end the nuclear efforts of...



The Hungry Steppe
Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan
Sarah Cameron
The Hungry Steppe examines one of the most heinous crimes of the Stalinist regime, the Kazakh famine of 1930–33. More than 1.5 million people perished in this famine, a quarter of Kazakhstan’s population, and the crisis transformed a territory the size of continental Europe. Yet the story of this famine has remained mostly hidden from...



Workers without Borders
Posted Work and Precarity in the EU
Ines Wagner
How the European Union handles posted workers is a growing issue for a region with borders that really are just lines on a map. A 2008 story, dissected in Ines Wagner’s Workers without Borders, about the troubling working conditions of migrant meat and construction workers, exposed a distressing dichotomy: how could a country with such strong...



A Primer on Legal Reasoning
Michael Evan Gold
After years of teaching law courses to undergraduate, graduate, and law students, Michael Evan Gold has come to believe that the traditional way of teaching – analysis, explanation, and example – is superior to the Socratic Method for students at the outset of their studies.In courses taught Socratically, even the most gifted students can...



War Tourism
Second World War France from Defeat and Occupation to the Creation of Heritage
Bertram M. Gordon
As German troops entered Paris following their victory in June 1940, the American journalist William L. Shirer observed that they carried cameras and behaved as "naïve tourists." One of the first things Hitler did after his victory was to tour occupied Paris, where he was famously photographed in front of the Eiffel Tower.Focusing on tourism by...



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