Results of the search for "Leuven University Press" 
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Wolfgang Rihm, a Chiffre
The 1980s and Beyond
Yves Knockaert
Wolfgang Rihm ( b. Karlsruhe, 1952) is the most performed living German composer. With his personal, expressive, and versatile music, he became the most prominent representative of his generation. His individual approach to music was established in the 1980s and he continues to explore and enlarge his original concepts today. His 1980s work is...



Moroccan Migration in Belgium
More than 50 Years of Settlement
Karim Ettourki
Moroccans are one of the largest and most debated migrant groups in Belgium. Moroccan Migration in Belgium analyses diverse facets of this community from a multidisciplinary perspective and addresses the most relevant and some underexposed topics in the rapidly developing field of migration studies. Combining various academic disciplines and...



Contrebande littéraire et culturelle à la Belle Époque
Le "hard labour" de Georges Eekhoud entre Anvers, Paris et Bruxelles
Maud Gonne






Diogenes of Oinoanda/Diogène d'Oenoanda
Epicureanism and Philosophical Debates/Épicurisme et controverses
The texts of Diogenes of Oinoanda (2nd century AD) who invited his readers to an Epicurean life is the largest ancient inscription ever discovered. Over 70 new finds have increased the number of known wall blocks and fragments to nearly 300, offering new insights into Diogenes' distinctive presentation of philosophy. This collection of essays...



European Muslims and New Media
European Muslims and New Media offers perspectives on the various ways in which Muslims use new media to form and reform Muslim consciousness, identities, and national and transnational belongings, and contest and negotiate tensions and hegemonic narratives in Western European societies. The authors explore how online discussion groups, social...



Sign or Symptom?
Exceptional Corporeal Phenomena in Religion and Medicine in the 19th and 20th Centuries
Described as 'the hand of God', as ‘pathological’ or even as ‘a clever trick’, exceptional corporeal phenomena such as miraculous cures, stigmata, and incorrupt corpses have triggered heated debates in the past. Depending on their definition as either ‘supernatural’, ‘psycho-somatic’ or ‘fraudulent’, different authorities have sought to explain...



The Lower to Middle Palaeolithic Transition in Northwestern Europe
Evidence from Kesselt-Op de Schans
Ann van Van Baelen
The shift from Lower to Middle Palaeolithic in northwestern Europe (dated to around 300,000–250,000 years ago) remains poorly understood and underexplored compared to more recent archaeological transitions. During this period, stone tool technologies underwent significant changes but the limited number of known sites and the general low...



Universalism and Liberation
Italian Catholic Culture and the Idea of International Community, 1963–1978
Jacopo Cellini
After decades of a problematic, if not plainly hostile, approach to modernity by Catholic culture, the 1960s marked the beginning of a new era. As the Church employed a more positive approach to the world, voices in the Catholic milieu embraced a radical perspective, channeling the need for social justice for the poor and the oppressed. The...



Cold War Triangle
How Scientists in East and West Tamed HIV
Renilde Loeckx
A small group of scientists were doggedly working in the field of antiviral treatments when the AIDS epidemic struck. Faced with one of the grand challenges of modern biology of the twentieth century, scientists worked across the political divide of the Cold War to produce a new class of antivirals. Their molecules were developed by a...



A Class of Their Own
The Düsseldorf School of Photography
Maren Polte
The 'Düsseldorf School' has become a household name in the art world for one of the most successful and influential strains of modern photography. Coined in the late 1980s, the name refers mainly to the pioneer group of students of the late Bernd Becher, who in 1976 became the first professor for creative photography at a German arts academy...



Victor Burgin’s "Parzival" in Leuven
Reflections on the "Uncinematic"
In commemoration of the destruction of the University Library of Leuven (Belgium) in August 1914, the projection work Parzival, created by Victor Burgin (UK, 1941) in 2013, was installed within the rebuilt Library. The installation uniquely marked the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, which left its profound traces on both the...



Bodies Beyond Borders
Moving Anatomies, 1750–1950
Around 1800 anatomy as a discipline rose to scientific prominence as it undergirded the Paris-centred clinical revolution in medicine. Although classical anatomy gradually lost ground in the following centuries in favor of new disciplines based on microscopic analysis, general anatomy nevertheless remained pivotal in the teaching of medicine...



Doing Double Dutch
The International Circulation of Literature from the Low Countries
Dutch literature is increasingly understood as a network of texts and poetics connected to other languages and literatures through translations and adaptations. In this book, a team of international researchers explores how Dutch literary texts cross linguistic, historical, geophysical, political, religious, and disciplinary borders, and...



Minoan Earthquakes
Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity
Does the "Minoan myth" still stand up to scientific scrutiny? Since the work of Sir Arthur Evans at Knossos (Crete, Greece), the romanticized vision of the Cretan Bronze Age as an era of peaceful prosperity only interrupted by the catastrophic effects of natural disasters has captured the popular and scientific imagination. Its impact on the...



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