Confronting Dystopia
The New Technological Revolution and the Future of Work
In Confronting Dystopia, a distinguished group of scholars analyze the implications of the ongoing technological revolution for jobs, working conditions, and income. Focusing on the economic and political implications of AI, digital connectivity, and robotics for both the Global North and the Global South, they move beyond diagnostics to seek...



The Geopolitics of Spectacle
Space, Synecdoche, and the New Capitals of Asia
Natalie Koch
Why do autocrats build spectacular new capital cities? In The Geopolitics of Spectacle, Natalie Koch considers how autocratic rulers use "spectacular" projects to shape state-society relations, but rather than focus on the standard approach—on the project itself—she considers the unspectacular "others." The contrasting views of those from the...



Grassroots to Global
Broader Impacts of Civic Ecology
Addressing participatory, transdisciplinary approaches to local stewardship of the environment, Grassroots to Global features scholars and stewards exploring the broad impacts of civic engagement with the environment.Chapters focus on questions that include: How might faith-based institutions in Chicago expand the work of church-community...



Intimate Violence
Anti-Jewish Pogroms on the Eve of the Holocaust
Jeffrey S. Kopstein, Jason Wittenberg
Why do pogroms occur in some localities and not in others? Jeffrey S. Kopstein and Jason Wittenberg examine a particularly brutal wave of violence that occurred across hundreds of predominantly Polish and Ukrainian communities in the aftermath of the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union. The authors note that while some communities erupted in...



Light without Heat
The Observational Mood from Bacon to Milton
David Carroll Simon
In Light without Heat, David Carroll Simon argues for the importance of carelessness to the literary and scientific experiments of the seventeenth century. While scholars have often looked to this period in order to narrate the triumph of methodical rigor as a quintessentially modern intellectual value, Simon describes the appeal of open-ended...



Summa (Quaestiones ordinariae) art. LX–LXII
Henry of Ghent was the most important thinker of the last quarter of the 13th century and his works were influential not only in his lifetime, but also in the following century and into the Renaissance.This critical edition of Henry of Ghent’s Summa, art. 60–62 deals with the Trinity. The respective articles are based upon this scholastic...



The Teahouse under Socialism
The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000
Di Wang
To understand a city fully, writes Di Wang, we must observe its most basic units of social life. In The Teahouse under Socialism, Wang does just that, arguing that the teahouses of Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, are some of the most important public spaces—perfect sites for examining the social and economic activities of everyday...



Traders in Motion
Identities and Contestations in the Vietnamese Marketplace
With essays covering diverse topics, from seafood trade across the Vietnam-China border, to street traders in Hanoi, to gold shops in Ho Chi Minh City, Traders in Motion spans the fields of economic and political anthropology, geography, and sociology to illuminate how Vietnam's rapidly expanding market economy is formed and transformed by...



Venice's Intimate Empire
Family Life and Scholarship in the Renaissance Mediterranean
Erin Maglaque
Mining private writings and humanist texts, Erin Maglaque explores the lives and careers of two Venetian noblemen, Giovanni Bembo and Pietro Coppo, who were appointed as colonial administrators and governors. In Venice’s Intimate Empire, she uses these two men and their families to showcase the relationship between humanism, empire, and family...



Art of the Ordinary
The Everyday Domain of Art, Film, Philosophy, and Poetry
Richard Deming
Cutting across literature, film, art, and philosophy, Art of the Ordinary is a trailblazing, cross-disciplinary engagement with the ordinary and the everyday. Because, writes Richard Deming, the ordinary is always at hand, it is, in fact, too familiar for us to perceive it and become fully aware of it. The ordinary he argues, is what most needs...



The Battle for Fortune
State-Led Development, Personhood, and Power among Tibetans in China
Charlene Makley
In a deeply ethnographic appraisal, based on years of in situ research, The Battle for Fortune looks at the rising stakes of Tibetans’ encounters with Chinese state-led development projects in the early 2000s. The book builds upon anthropology’s qualitative approach to personhood, power and space to rethink the premises and consequences of...



Birds of Nicaragua
A Field Guide
Liliana Chavarría-Duriaux, David C. Hille, Robert Dean
Birders in Central America have long known that Nicaragua is one of the best birding locations in the world, and with tourism to the country on the upswing, birders from the rest of the world are now coming to the same conclusion. The largest country in Central America, Nicaragua is home to 763 resident and passage birds, by latest count...



Contemporary Slavery
The Rhetoric of Global Human Rights Campaigns
This volume brings together a cast of leading experts to carefully explore how the history and iconography of slavery has been invoked to support a series of government interventions, activist projects, legal instruments, and rhetorical performances. However well-intentioned these interventions might be, they nonetheless remain subject to a...



Dark Age Nunneries
The Ambiguous Identity of Female Monasticism, 800–1050
Steven Vanderputten
In Dark Age Nunneries, Steven Vanderputten dismantles the common view of women religious between 800 and 1050 as disempowered or even disinterested witnesses to their own lives. It is based on a study of primary sources from forty female monastic communities in Lotharingia—a politically and culturally diverse region that boasted an...



Embattled River
The Hudson and Modern American Environmentalism
David Schuyler
In Embattled River, David Schuyler describes the efforts to reverse the pollution and bleak future of the Hudson River that became evident in the 1950s. Through his investigative narrative, Schuyler uncovers the critical role of this iconic American waterway in the emergence of modern environmentalism in the United States.Writing fifty-five...



The Evils of Polygyny
Evidence of Its Harm to Women, Men, and Society
Rose McDermott
Why do men act violently toward women?What are the consequences of "normal violence," not only for women and children but also for the men who instigate it, and for the societies that sanction it?The Evils of Polygyny examines one powerful structural factor that instigates, enforces, and replicates patterns of male dominance: the practice of...



Girl with Dead Bird
Intercultural Observations
Volkmar Mühleis
The portrait we have come to call Little Girl with Dead Bird is an enigma. On the one hand, we hardly know anything about this sixteenth-century masterpiece. But even so, on the other hand the picture fascinates viewers to this day. This painting's indeterminate yet compelling status provides Volkmar Mühleis grounds to look beyond its...



History Is a Contemporary Literature
Manifesto for the Social Sciences
Ivan Jablonka
Ivan Jablonka’s History Is a Contemporary Literature offers highly innovative perspectives on the writing of history, the relationship between literature and the social sciences, and the way that both social-scientific inquiry and literary explorations contribute to our understanding of the world. Jablonka argues that the act and art of...



Indonesia Journal
October 2017
Indonesia is a semi-annual journal devoted to the timely study of Indonesia's culture, history, government, economy, and society. It features original scholarly articles, interviews, translations, and book reviews. Published Cornell University's Southeast Asia Program since April 1966, the journal provides area scholars and interested readers...



Laboratory of Socialist Development
Cold War Politics and Decolonization in Soviet Tajikistan
Artemy M. Kalinovsky
Artemy Kalinovsky’s Laboratory of Socialist Development investigates the Soviet effort to make promises of decolonization a reality by looking at the politics and practices of economic development in central Asia between World War II and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Focusing on the Tajik Soviet Socialist Republic, Kalinovsky places the...



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