Collection : Cornell Studies in Security Affairs

A series edited by Robert J. Art, Robert Jervis, and Stephen M. Walt

For a complete list of all titles published in this series, inlcuding out-of-print books, see: http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/info/?fa=text84.

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A Grand Strategy for America
Robert J. Art
What strategic behavior is appropriate for a state as powerful as the U.S.? To answer this question, Robert J. Art concentrates on "grand strategy"—the deployment of military power in both peace and war to support foreign policy goals.



Corporate Warriors
The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry
P. W. Singer
Some have claimed that'War is too important to be left to the generals,'but P. W. Singer asks'What about the business executives?'Breaking out of the guns-for-hire mold of traditional mercenaries, corporations now sell skills and services that until recently only state militaries possessed. Their products range from trained commando teams to...



Fast Tanks and Heavy Bombers
Innovation in the U.S. Army, 1917–1945
David E. Johnson
Johnson examines the U.S. Army's innovations for both armor and aviation between the world wars, offering valuable insights for future military innovation.



Storm of Steel
The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union, 1919–1939
Mary R. Habeck
In this fascinating account of the battle tanks that saw combat in the European Theater of World War II, Mary R. Habeck traces the strategies developed in Germany and the Soviet Union between the wars for the use of armored vehicles in...



America Unrivaled
The Future of the Balance of Power
American power today is without historical precedent, dominating the world system. No other nation has enjoyed such formidable advantages in military, economic, technological, cultural, and political capabilities. How stable is this unipolar American...



Vital Crossroads
Mediterranean Origins of the Second World War, 1935–1940
Reynolds M. Salerno
Most international historians present the outbreak of World War II as the result of an irreconcilable conflict between Great Britain and Germany. This ubiquitous Anglo-German perspective fails to recognize complex causes and repercussions of...



Uncovering Ways of War
U.S. Intelligence and Foreign Military Innovation, 1918–1941
Thomas G. Mahnken
Thomas G. Mahnken sheds light on the shadowy world of U.S. intelligence-gathering, tracing how America learned of military developments in Japan, Germany, and Great Britain in the period between the two world wars.



No Exit
America and the German Problem, 1943–1954
James McAllister
This new account of early Cold War history focuses on the emergence of a bipolar structure of power, the continuing importance of the German question, and American efforts to create a united Western Europe.



The Origins of Major War
Dale C. Copeland
Copeland asks why governments make decisions that lead to, sustain, and intensify conflicts, drawing on detailed historical narratives of several twentieth-century cases, including World War I, World War II, and the Cold War.



The Ethics of Destruction
Norms and Force in International Relations
Ward Thomas
Many assume that in international politics, and especially in war, "anything goes." Civil War general William Sherman said war "is all hell." The implication behind the maxim is that in war, as in hell, there is no order, only chaos; no mercy, only...



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