Collection : Cornell Studies in Security Affairs

A series edited by Robert J. Art, Robert Jervis, and Stephen M. Walt

For a complete list of all titles published in this series, inlcuding out-of-print books, see: http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/info/?fa=text84.

<<< 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 >>>
    sort list by title

Whole World on Fire
Organizations, Knowledge, and Nuclear Weapons Devastation
Lynn Eden
Whole World on Fire focuses on a technical riddle wrapped in an organizational mystery: How and why, for more than half a century, did the U.S. government fail to predict nuclear fire damage as it drew up plans to fight strategic nuclear war? U.S...



The Peace of Illusions
American Grand Strategy from 1940 to the Present
Christopher Layne
In a provocative book about American hegemony, Christopher Layne outlines his belief that U.S. foreign policy has been consistent in its aims for more than sixty years and that the current Bush administration clings to mid-twentieth-century tactics—to...



Final Solutions
Mass Killing and Genocide in the 20th Century
Benjamin A. Valentino
Benjamin A. Valentino finds that ethnic hatreds or discrimination, undemocratic systems of government, and dysfunctions in society play a much smaller role in mass killing and genocide than is commonly assumed. He shows that the impetus for...



The Ideological Origins of Great Power Politics, 1789–1989
Mark L. Haas
How do leaders perceive threat levels in world politics, and what effects do those perceptions have on policy choices? Mark L. Haas focuses on how ideology shapes perception. He does not delineate the content of particular ideologies, but rather...



War and the Engineers
The Primacy of Politics over Technology
Keir A. Lieber
Do some technologies provoke war? Do others promote peace? Offense-defense theory contends that technological change is an important cause of conflict: leaders will be tempted to launch wars when they believe innovation favors attackers...



The Remnants of War
John Mueller
Mueller argues that war is an idea, like dueling or slavery, that has been substantially discredited, reduced to its remnants—or dregs—and thugs are the residual combatants.



Divided Union
The Politics of War in the Early American Republic
Scott A. Silverstone
Between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, the United States was embroiled in competitive inter-state politics. Although it did not directly involve itself in European affairs, the United States did engage regularly in dangerous struggles...



Balancing Risks
Great Power Intervention in the Periphery
Jeffrey W. Taliaferro
Great powers often initiate risky military and diplomatic inventions in far-off, peripheral regions that pose no direct threat to them, risking direct confrontation with rivals in strategically inconsequential places. Why do powerful countries behave...



Final Solutions
Mass Killing and Genocide in the 20th Century
Benjamin A. Valentino
Benjamin A. Valentino finds that ethnic hatreds or discrimination, undemocratic systems of government, and dysfunctions in society play a much smaller role in mass killing and genocide than is commonly assumed. He shows that the impetus for...



Pivotal Deterrence
Third-Party Statecraft and the Pursuit of Peace
Timothy W. Crawford
As the preponderant world power, the United States is a potential arbiter of war and peace between such feuding rivals as India and Pakistan, Turkey and Greece, China and Taiwan. How can it deter them from going to war and impel them to accept...



<<< 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 >>>

Connect with us

Newsletters