Collection : Cornell Studies in Security Affairs

A series edited by Robert J. Art, Robert Jervis, and Stephen M. Walt

For a complete list of all titles published in this series, inlcuding out-of-print books, see: http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/info/?fa=text84.

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Divided Union
The Politics of War in the Early American Republic
Scott A. Silverstone
Between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, the United States was embroiled in competitive inter-state politics. Although it did not directly involve itself in European affairs, the United States did engage regularly in dangerous struggles with...



Balancing Risks
Great Power Intervention in the Periphery
Jeffrey W. Taliaferro
Great powers often initiate risky military and diplomatic inventions in far-off, peripheral regions that pose no direct threat to them, risking direct confrontation with rivals in strategically inconsequential places. Why do powerful countries behave...



Pivotal Deterrence
Third-Party Statecraft and the Pursuit of Peace
Timothy W. Crawford
As the preponderant world power, the United States is a potential arbiter of war and peace between such feuding rivals as India and Pakistan, Turkey and Greece, China and Taiwan. How can it deter them from going to war and impel them to accept...



The Purpose of Intervention
Changing Beliefs about the Use of Force
Martha Finnemore
Finnemore examines changes over the past 400 years about why countries intervene militarily as well as in the ways they have intervened.



A Grand Strategy for America
Robert J. Art
What strategic behavior is appropriate for a state as powerful as the U.S.? To answer this question, Robert J. Art concentrates on "grand strategy"—the deployment of military power in both peace and war to support foreign policy goals.



Fast Tanks and Heavy Bombers
Innovation in the U.S. Army, 1917–1945
David E. Johnson
Johnson examines the U.S. Army's innovations for both armor and aviation between the world wars, offering valuable insights for future military innovation.



Storm of Steel
The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union, 1919–1939
Mary R. Habeck
In this fascinating account of the battle tanks that saw combat in the European Theater of World War II, Mary R. Habeck traces the strategies developed in Germany and the Soviet Union between the wars for the use of armored vehicles in battle.



America Unrivaled
The Future of the Balance of Power
American power today is without historical precedent, dominating the world system. No other nation has enjoyed such formidable advantages in military, economic, technological, cultural, and political capabilities. How stable is this unipolar American...



Vital Crossroads
Mediterranean Origins of the Second World War, 1935–1940
Reynolds M. Salerno
Most international historians present the outbreak of World War II as the result of an irreconcilable conflict between Great Britain and Germany. This ubiquitous Anglo-German perspective fails to recognize complex causes and repercussions of...



Uncovering Ways of War
U.S. Intelligence and Foreign Military Innovation, 1918–1941
Thomas G. Mahnken
Thomas G. Mahnken sheds light on the shadowy world of U.S. intelligence-gathering, tracing how America learned of military developments in Japan, Germany, and Great Britain in the period between the two world wars.



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