Collection : The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work

The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work explores the historical, social, political, and economic forces that shape health care work and organizations. Focusing on the work of professional and nonprofessional staff as well as family caregivers, the series illuminates how the culture of health care work affects the structuring of health policy and practice. In an increasingly global marketplace, the series also seeks to better understand the international context within which all health systems function. Looking at health policy and the health professions from a variety of perspectives, including first-person accounts, the series is aimed at a wide audience including those who work in health care, academics, policy makers, and professional organizations, as well as general readers.

Proposals and inquiries about the series should be sent to Suzanne Gordon (lsupport@comcast.net) or Sioban Nelson (dean.nursing@utoronto.ca)

Series Editors

Suzanne Gordon is an award-winning journalist whose work focuses on the health care work force, political culture, and women's issues. She is author of Life Support: Three Nurses on the Front Lines and Nursing against the Odds: How Health Care Cost Cutting, Media Stereotypes, and Medical Hubris Undermine Nurses and Patient Care, coauthor of Safety in Numbers: Nurse-to-Patient Ratios and the Future of Health Care and From Silence to Voice: What Nurses Know and Must Communicate to the Public, editor of When Chicken Soup Isn't Enough: Stories of Nurses Standing Up for Themselves, Their Patients, and Their Profession, and coeditor (with Sioban Nelson) of The Complexities of Care: Nursing Reconsidered.

Sioban Nelson is Dean and Professor at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Her books include, as coeditor, The Complexities of Care: Nursing Reconsidered and Notes on Nightingale: The Influence and Legacy of a Nursing Icon.

<<< 1 2 3 4 5 >>>
    sort list by publication date

My Imaginary Illness
A Journey into Uncertainty and Prejudice in Medical Diagnosis
Chloë G. K. Atkins
My Imaginary Illness is the compelling story of Atkins's decades-long battle with a disease deemed imaginary, her frustration with a succession of doctors and diagnoses and her excruciating physical and emotional journey back to wellness.



Never Good Enough
Health Care Workers and the False Promise of Job Training
Ariel Ducey
A thoughtful and provocative critique of job training in the health care sector.



Notes on Nightingale
The Influence and Legacy of a Nursing Icon
Florence Nightingale and her place in nursing history and in contemporary nursing discourse is a topic of continuing interest for nursing students, teachers, and professional associations. This book offers new scholarship on her work and legacy.



Nurses on the Move
Migration and the Global Health Care Economy
Mireille Kingma
South African nurses care for patients in London, hospitals recruit Filipino nurses to Los Angeles, and Chinese nurses practice their profession in Ireland. In every industrialized country of the world, patients today increasingly find that the nurses...



Nursing against the Odds
How Health Care Cost Cutting, Media Stereotypes, and Medical Hubris Undermine Nurses and Patient Care
Suzanne Gordon
In this book, Suzanne Gordon draws on in-depth interviews with nurses and other health care professionals, research studies, and extensive firsthand reporting to better understand the myriad causes of and possible solutions to the current nursing crisis.



Out of Practice
Fighting for Primary Care Medicine in America
Frederick M. Barken
Confronting our failing primary health care system, finding solutions in stronger doctor-patient relationships.



Phantom Billing, Fake Prescriptions, and the High Cost of Medicine
Health Care Fraud and What to Do about It
Terry L. Leap
Confronting medical fraud and its economic, psychological, and social costs.



Prescription for the People
An Activist’s Guide to Making Medicine Affordable for All
Fran Quigley
In Prescription for the People, Fran Quigley diagnoses our inability to get medicines to the people who need them and then prescribes the cure. He delivers a clear and convincing argument for a complete shift in the global and U.S. approach to...



The Question of Competence
Reconsidering Medical Education in the Twenty-First Century
Experts from the United States, Canada, and the Netherlands explore medical competency from different perspectives in order to spark thoughtful discussion and debate on the subject.



Safety in Numbers
Nurse-to-Patient Ratios and the Future of Health Care
Suzanne Gordon, John Buchanan, Tanya Bretherton
The first book to examine the arguments for and against mandated nurse-to-patient ratios, utilizing survey data, interviews, and other original research to focus on two case studies (California and the Australian state of Victoria).



<<< 1 2 3 4 5 >>>

Connect with us

Newsletters