Collection : Signale: Modern German Letters, Cultures, and Thought

Series editor: Peter Uwe Hohendahl, Cornell University

Signale: Modern German Letters, Cultures, and Thought provides a new publishing model for the best new English-language book manuscripts in German literature, criticism, and cultural studies and translations of important German-language works.

Signale construes "modern" in the broadest terms: from post-medieval Frühe Neuzeit to post-modern present. Home to a range of interdisciplinary and theoretical work concerned with this extended modernity, the series will also build focus clusters in areas of German Studies scholarship that have become increasingly difficult to place in the North American publishing context, but which remain fundamental to the health of the discipline. Work on the early modern period – Humanism, Baroque, Enlightenment – will form one such focus area; literary studies of the work of individual authors will be another. One goal is better integration into a broader interdisciplinary understanding of German studies of periods and scholarly genres that are vulnerable to marginalization.

Signale books are published under a joint imprint of Cornell University Press and Cornell University Library in electronic and print formats. Manuscript submissions to Signale undergo the same rigorous editorial and peer review as Cornell University Press monographs published in the traditional manner. Publication of Signale books is supported by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Individuals interested in having their project considered for inclusion in Signale are asked to send a cover letter and a 3- to 5-page prospectus that summarizes the book project, describes its relationship to existing scholarship, and identifies its likely audience. The prospectus should include a chapter outline and specify the length of the manuscript (in words); if the manuscript is not yet completed, a time frame for completion should be included. The letter and prospectus should be sent in electronic form (MS Word) to the managing editor:

Kizer Walker
Managing Editor, Signale Series
Cornell University Library
310 Uris Library
Ithaca, NY 14853
email: kw33@cornell.edu

For more information about Signale, visit the series website: http://signale.cornell.edu/

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Speaking the Unspeakable in Postwar Germany
Toward a Public Discourse on the Holocaust
Sonja Boos
In this an interdisciplinary study of a diverse set of public speeches given by major literary and cultural figures in the 1950s and 1960s, Sonja Boos demonstrates that these speakers both facilitated and subverted the construction of a public discourse about the Holocaust in postwar West Germany.



Necessary Luxuries
Books, Literature, and the Culture of Consumption in Germany, 1770–1815
Matt Erlin
Matt Erlin considers books and the culture around books during this period, focusing specifically on Germany where literature, and the fine arts in general, were the subject of soul-searching debates over the legitimacy of luxury.



Berlin Coquette
Prostitution and the New German Woman, 1890–1933
Jill Suzanne Smith
Smith recovers a surprising array of discussions about extramarital sexuality, women's financial autonomy, and respectability in ate Wilhelmine and Weimar Germany.



Inconceivable Effects
Ethics through Twentieth-Century German Literature, Thought, and Film
Martin Blumenthal-Barby
Blumenthal-Barby reads theoretical, literary and cinematic works that appear noteworthy for the ethical questions they raise.



The Topography of Modernity
Karl Philipp Moritz and the Space of Autonomy
Elliott Schreiber
Elliott Schreiber explores Karl Philipp Moritz's many contributions to the intellectual evolution of the Enlightenment and positions the German thinker as an incisive early observer and theorist of modernity.



Formative Fictions
Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Bildungsroman
Tobias Boes
Boes argues that the dual status of the Bildungsroman renders this novelistic form an elegant way to negotiate the diverging critical discourses surrounding national and world literature.



Memory, Metaphor, and Aby Warburg's Atlas of Images
Christopher D. Johnson
Christopher D. Johnson traces several thematic sequences in the panels of Aby Warburg's encyclopedic Mnemosyne (Atlas of Images), begun in earnest in 1927, and left unfinished at the time of Warburg's death in 1929.



The Total Work of Art in European Modernism
David Roberts
Situating the Gesamtkunstwerk at the heart of European modernism.



Benjamin's Library
Modernity, Nation, and the Baroque
Jane O. Newman
Recovering Walter Benjamin's connection to seventeenth-century Baroque literature and political theory.



On the Ruins of Babel
Architectural Metaphor in German Thought
Daniel Purdy
Purdy traces the use of architectural reasoning as a method for critically examining consciousness from Kant and Hegel to Benjamin and Libeskind.



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