Collection : The United States in the World

Browse the latest The United States in the World series catalog

Books in this innovative series globalize the study of United States history. It features extraordinary works that explore how people, ideas, processes, and events that transcend national borders have shaped United States history from the antebellum period through the present. Cornell University Press and the series editors welcome established and emerging scholars based in the United States and abroad who work on diverse topics and regions of the world.

The series encourages books that integrate the methodologies of transnational and international history, particularly the use of domestic and international archives; multilingual sources; and the study of the important role played by both state and non-state actors. The goal of the United States in the World series is to bring together the best new scholarship that globalizes United States history, thereby enriching and broadening our understanding of United States history.

Please send inquiries to: David C. Engerman (david.engerman@yale.edu), Amy S. Greenberg (amygreenberg@psu.edu), or Paul A. Kramer (paul.a.kramer@vanderbilt.edu).

Forthcoming volumes in the series include:

Foreign Affairs: Policy, Culture, and the Making of Love and War in Vietnam by Amanda Chapman Boczar

Outsourcing Democracy: U.S. NGOs and the Collapse of the Soviet Union by Kate Geoghegan

The Gathering Storm: The United States, Eduardo Frei's Revolution in Liberty, and the Polarization of Chilean Politics, 1964-1970 by Sebastiàn Hurtado-Torres

The Ends of Modernization: Development, Ideology, and Catastrophe in Nicaragua after the Alliance for Progress by David Johnson Lee

The Asian Cinema Network: The Asian Film Festival, the Asia Foundation, and the Cultural Cold War in Asia by Sangjoon Lee

The Arc of Containment: Britain, Malaya, Singapore, and the Rise of American Hegemony in Southeast Asia by Wen-Qing Ngoei

The Greek Fire: The Greek Revolution and the Emergence of American Reform Movements by Maureen Santelli

The Proving Ground: Competing Visions for Democracy and Human Rights during the Cold War by William Michael Schmidli

Pursuing Respectability in the Cannibal Isles: Americans in Nineteenth-century Fiji by Nancy Shoemaker

The United States, the International Community, and Indonesia's New Order, 1966–1998 by Bradley R. Simpson

To Bring the Good News to All Nations: Evangelicals, Human Rights, and U.S. Foreign Policy by Lauren Turek

The Value of Interests: The Politics of U.S. Human Rights Diplomacy in Latin America, 1973-1984 by Vanessa Walker

Oil Money: How Petrodollars Transformed U.S.-Middle East Relations, 1967–1986 by David M. Wight

Series Editors

David C. Engerman is Professor of History at Yale University. He has written two books on American ideas about Russia/USSR, including Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America's Soviet Experts. His longstanding interest in modernization and development programs in the Third World has led to two co-edited collections (including Staging Growth: Modernization, Development, and the Global Cold War) and his new book, The Price of Aid: The Economic Cold War in India.  His current research is on the global politics of economic inequality in the 1970s.

Amy S. Greenberg is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Women's Studies at Pennsylvania State University. She is the author of four books, including the prize-winning A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico; Manifest Destiny and American Territorial Expansion: A Brief History with Documents; and Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire. She is currently at work on a study of the role of dissent in nineteenth-century U.S. foreign policy.

Paul A. Kramer is Associate Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines, winner of the Stuart L. Bernath and James Rawley Prizes, as well as numerous articles on U. S. transnational, imperial and global histories. His current project deals with the intersection between immigration and imperial politics in the United States across the 20th century.

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Empire's Twin
U.S. Anti-imperialism from the Founding Era to the Age of Terrorism
Empire's Twin broadens our conception of anti-imperialist actors, ideas, and actions; it charts this story across the range of American history, from the Revolution to our own era; and it opens up the transnational and global dimensions of American...



With Sails Whitening Every Sea
Mariners and the Making of an American Maritime Empire
Brian Rouleau
Brian Rouleau argues that because of their ubiquity in foreign ports, American sailors were the principal agents of overseas foreign relations in the early...



From Development to Dictatorship
Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era
Thomas C. Field
Thomas C. Field Jr. reconstructs the untold story of USAID's first years in Bolivia, including the country's 1964 military coup...



A Union Forever
The Irish Question and U.S. Foreign Relations in the Victorian Age
David Sim
David Sim examines how Irish nationalists and their American sympathizers tried to convince legislators and statesmen to use the global influence of the United States to achieve Irish independence.



Radicals on the Road
Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era
Judy Tzu-Chun Wu
Wu analyzes how interactions among people from the U.S. and several East and Southeast Asian nations inspired transnational identities and multiracial coalitions that challenged political commitments during the Vietnam War era.



Cauldron of Resistance
Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and 1950s Southern Vietnam
Jessica M. Chapman
In 1955, Ngo Dinh Diem organized an election to depose chief-of-state Bao Dai, after which he proclaimed himself the first president of the newly created Republic of Vietnam. The United States sanctioned the results of this election, which was widely condemned as fraudulent, and provided substantial economic aid and advice to the RVN. Because...



The Universe Unraveling
American Foreign Policy in Cold War Laos
Seth Jacobs
The Universe Unraveling is a provocative reinterpretation of U.S.-Laos relations in the years leading up to the Vietnam War. U.S. policy toward Laos under Eisenhower and Kennedy cannot be understood apart from the traits Americans ascribed to Lao allies.



Militarism in a Global Age
Naval Ambitions in Germany and the United States before World War I
Dirk Bönker
Dirk Bönker explores the far-reaching ambitions of German and U.S. naval officers before World War I as they advanced navalism, a particular brand of modern militarism that stressed the paramount importance of sea power.



The Business of Empire
United Fruit, Race, and U.S. Expansion in Central America
Jason M. Colby
Colby provides new insight into the role of transnational capital, labor migration, and racial nationalism in shaping U.S. expansion into Central America and the greater Caribbean.



Black Yanks in the Pacific
Race in the Making of American Military Empire after World War II
Michael Cullen Green
By the end of World War II, many black citizens viewed service in the segregated American armed forces with distaste if not disgust. Meanwhile, domestic racism and Jim Crow, ongoing Asian struggles against European colonialism, and prewar calls for...



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