Collection : Cornell Studies in Classical Philology

The series Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, founded in 1887, is published jointly by the Cornell University Department of Classics and Cornell University Press. It includes monographs on a wide range of subjects within the field (traditionally by authors with some association, past or present, with the University) and published versions of the Townsend Lectures presented at Cornell. Manuscripts submitted are evaluated both by the Classics Department faculty and referees for Cornell University Press.

<<< 1 2
    sort list by publication date

On Roman Religion
Lived Religion and the Individual in Ancient Rome
Jorg Rupke
Jorg Rupke, one of the world's leading authorities on Roman religion, demonstrates in his new book that it was a lived religion with individual appropriations evident at the heart of such rituals as praying, dedicating, making vows, and reading.



The Origin of Sin
An English Translation of the "Hamartigenia"
Prudentius
The first English translation in more than 40 years of Prudentius's "Hamartigenia," which considers the origin of sin in the universe and its consequences, culminating with a vision of judgment day.



Platonic Ethics, Old and New
Julia Annas
Julia Annas here offers a fundamental reexamination of Plato's ethical thought by investigating the Middle Platonist perspective, which emerged at the end of Plato's own school, the Academy.



Seneca's "Hercules Furens"
A Critical Text with Introduction and Commentary
Seneca
John G. Fitch's new Latin text of Seneca's play, Hercules Furens, is based on a collation of the chief manuscripts, including the Paris manuscript T.






The Space That Remains
Reading Latin Poetry in Late Antiquity
Aaron Pelttari
Aaron Pelttari offers the first systematic study of fourth-century Roman poets in a quarter century, giving equal attention to both Christian and Pagan poetry while also taking seriously the issue of readership.



A Study of Sophoclean Drama
G. M. Kirkwood
This book shows how Sophocles' method of presenting character, his unique handling of myth, his predilection for presenting ideas by comparison and contrast, and his principles of structure are so closely related that they serve to clarify each other.






<<< 1 2

Connect with us

Newsletters