Collection : Cornell Studies in Security Affairs

A series edited by Robert J. Art, Robert Jervis, and Stephen M. Walt

For a complete list of all titles published in this series, inlcuding out-of-print books, see: http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/info/?fa=text84.

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Bombing to Win
Air Power and Coercion in War
Robert A. Pape
In this now-classic work of the theory and practice of airpower and its political effects, Robert A. Pape helps military strategists and policy makers judge the purpose of various air strategies, and helps general readers understand the policy debates.



Calculating Credibility
How Leaders Assess Military Threats
Daryl G. Press
Calculating Credibility examines—and ultimately rejects—a fundamental belief held by laypeople and the makers of American foreign policy: the notion that backing down during a crisis reduces a country's future credibility. Fear of diminished...



Causes of War
Power and the Roots of Conflict
Stephen Van Evera
What causes war? How can military conflicts best be prevented? In this book, Stephen Van Evera frames five conditions that increase the risk of interstate war.



China's Ascent
Power, Security, and the Future of International Politics
This book offers multiple analytical perspectives—constructivist, liberal, neorealist—on the significance of the many dimensions of China's regional and global influence and considers the likelihood of conflict or peaceful accommodation.



Conventional Deterrence
John J. Mearsheimer
Conventional Deterrence is a book about the origins of war. Why do nations faced with the prospect of large-scale conventional war opt for or against an offensive strategy? John J. Mearsheimer examines a number of crises that led to major conventional wars to explain why deterrence failed.



Cooperation under Fire
Anglo-German Restraint during World War II
Jeffrey W. Legro
Legro offers a new understanding of the dynamics of World War II and the sources of international cooperation.



Corporate Warriors
The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry
P. W. Singer
Some have claimed that'War is too important to be left to the generals,'but P. W. Singer asks'What about the business executives?'Breaking out of the guns-for-hire mold of traditional mercenaries, corporations now sell skills and services that until recently only state militaries possessed. Their products range from trained commando teams to...



The Costs of Conversation
Obstacles to Peace Talks in Wartime
Oriana Skylar Mastro
After a war breaks out, what factors influence the warring parties' decisions about whether to talk to their enemy, and when may their position on wartime diplomacy change? How do we get from only fighting to also talking?In The Costs of Conversation, Oriana Skylar Mastro argues that states are primarily concerned with the strategic costs of...



Covert Regime Change
America's Secret Cold War
Lindsey A. O'Rourke
States seldom resort to war to overthrow their adversaries. They are more likely to attempt to covertly change the opposing regime, by assassinating a foreign leader, sponsoring a coup d’état, meddling in a democratic election, or secretly aiding foreign dissident groups.In Covert Regime Change, Lindsey A. O’Rourke shows us how states really...



Dangerous Sanctuaries
Refugee Camps, Civil War, and the Dilemmas of Humanitarian Aid
Sarah Kenyon Lischer
Vital reading for anyone concerned with how refugee flows affect the dynamics of conflicts around the world.



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