Collection : The United States in the World

Books in this innovative series globalize the study of United States history. It features extraordinary works that explore how people, ideas, processes, and events that transcend national borders have shaped United States history from the antebellum period through the present. Cornell University Press and the series editors welcome established and emerging scholars based in the United States and abroad who work on diverse topics and regions of the world.

The series encourages books that integrate the methodologies of transnational and international history, particularly the use of domestic and international archives; multilingual sources; and the study of the important role played by both state and non-state actors. The goal of the United States in the World series is to bring together the best new scholarship that globalizes United States history, thereby enriching and broadening our understanding of United States history.

Please send inquiries to: Mark Philip Bradley (mbradley@uchicago.edu) David C. Engerman (engerman@brandeis.edu), Amy S. Greenberg (asg5@psu.edu), and Paul A. Kramer (paul.a.kramer@vanderbilt.edu).

 

Forthcoming volumes in the series include:

The Rise of the Defense Intellectual: Hans Speier and the Trans-Atlantic Origins of Cold War Foreign Policy by Daniel Bessner

Out of Oakland: The Black Panther Party, the Third World, and the Cold War by Sean Malloy

Redemption and Revolution: American and Chinese New Women in the Early Twentieth Century by Motoe Sasaki

The United States, the International Community, and Indonesia's New Order, 1966–1998 by Bradley R. Simpson

The Value of Interests: The Politics of U.S. Human Rights Diplomacy in Latin America, 1973-1984 by Vanessa Walker

Oil Money: How Petrodollars Transformed U.S.-Middle East Relations, 1967–1986 by David M. Wight

Imperfect Strangers: Americans and Arabs in the 1970s by Salim Yaqub

 

 


Series Editors

Mark Philip Bradley is Professor of International History at the University of Chicago . He is the author of the prize-winning Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950 and co-editor of Truth Claims: Representation and Human Rights. He is currently working on a book that explores the history of the global human rights revolution in the twentieth century and an international history of the wars in Vietnam.

David C. Engerman is professor of History at Brandeis University. He has written two books on American ideas about Russia/USSR, including most recently Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America's Soviet Experts. His longstanding interest in modernization and development programs in the Third World has led to two co-edited collections (including Staging Growth: Modernization, Development, and the Global Cold War) and a current project on American and Soviet aid to India.

Amy S. Greenberg is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Women's Studies at Pennsylvania State University. She is the author of four books, including the prize-winning A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico; Manifest Destiny and American Territorial Expansion: A Brief History with Documents; and Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire. She is currently at work on a study of the role of dissent in nineteenth-century U.S. foreign policy.

Paul A. Kramer is Associate Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines, winner of the Stuart L. Bernath and James Rawley Prizes, as well as numerous articles on U. S. transnational, imperial and global histories. His current project deals with the intersection between immigration and imperial politics in the United States across the 20th century.

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Out of Oakland
Black Panther Party Internationalism during the Cold War
Sean L. Malloy
In Out of Oakland, Sean L. Malloy explores the evolving internationalism of the Black Panther Party. He traces the shifting intersections between the black freedom struggle in the United States, Third World anticolonialism, and the Cold War.



Redemption and Revolution
American and Chinese New Women in the Early Twentieth Century
Motoe Sasaki
In the early twentieth century, a good number of college-educated Protestant American women went abroad by taking up missionary careers in teaching, nursing, and medicine. Motoe Sasaki's transnational history of these New Women explores the intersections of gender, modernity, and national identity within the politics of world history.



Imperfect Strangers
Americans, Arabs, and U.S.–Middle East Relations in the 1970s
Salim Yaqub
In Imperfect Strangers, Salim Yaqub argues that the 1970s were a pivotal decade for U.S.-Arab relations, whether at the upper levels of diplomacy, in street-level interactions, or in the realm of the imagination.



For God and Globe
Christian Internationalism in the United States between the Great War and the Cold War
Michael G. Thompson
For God and Globe recovers the history of an important yet largely forgotten intellectual movement in interwar America. Michael G. Thompson explores the way radical-left and ecumenical Protestant internationalists articulated new understandings of the ethics of international relations between the 1920s and the 1940s.



White World Order, Black Power Politics
The Birth of American International Relations
Robert Vitalis
In White World Order, Black Power Politics, Robert Vitalis recovers the arguments, texts, and institution building of an extraordinary group of professors at Howard University, including Alain Locke, Ralph Bunche, Rayford Logan, Eric Williams, and Merze Tate, who was the first black female professor of political science in the country.



The Diplomacy of Migration
Transnational Lives and the Making of U.S.-Chinese Relations in the Cold War
Meredith Oyen
The Diplomacy of Migration combines important innovations in the field of diplomatic history with new international trends in migration history. During the Cold War, both Chinese and American officials employed a wide range of migration policies and practices to pursue legitimacy, security, and prestige.



Christian Imperialism
Converting the World in the Early American Republic
Emily Conroy-Krutz
In describing how American missionaries interacted with a range of foreign locations (including India, Liberia, the Middle East, the Pacific Islands, North America, and Singapore) and imperial contexts, Christian Imperialism provides a new perspective on how Americans thought of their country's role in the world.



Empire's Twin
U.S. Anti-imperialism from the Founding Era to the Age of Terrorism
Empire's Twin broadens our conception of anti-imperialist actors, ideas, and actions; it charts this story across the range of American history, from the Revolution to our own era; and it opens up the transnational and global dimensions of American anti-imperialism.



With Sails Whitening Every Sea
Mariners and the Making of an American Maritime Empire
Brian Rouleau
Brian Rouleau argues that because of their ubiquity in foreign ports, American sailors were the principal agents of overseas foreign relations in the early republic.



From Development to Dictatorship
Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era
Thomas C. Field
Thomas C. Field Jr. reconstructs the untold story of USAID's first years in Bolivia, including the country's 1964 military coup d’état.



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