Collection : Cornell Studies in Money

Money is ubiquitous in human affairs. The uses to which money are put are not only economic but also political, social and cultural. Cornell Studies in Money features books that explore the diversity of money, past, present and future, as well as those that examine money and finance and their management both as an economic phenomenon and as a political, geographical, social and cultural fact.

Topics of interest include (but are not limited to):

•International financial institutions such as the IMF, World Bank and BIS
•Monetary phenomena as sources of historical, political and social change
•International political implications of the Euro and of currency competition more broadly
•The role of money and monetary policy in economic reform, development and transitions
•Macroeconomic diplomacy and exchange rate coordination
•Financial crises and their management
•Political and social consequences of capital mobility and financial globalization

Please send inquiries to: Eric Helleiner (ehellein@uwaterloo.ca) and Jonathan Kirshner (jdk5@cornell.edu).

Series Editors

Eric Helleiner is CIGI Chair in International Governance and Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo.

Jonanthan Kirshner is Professor of Government and Director of the International Political Economy Program at Cornell University.

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American Power after the Financial Crisis
Jonathan Kirshner
Jonathan Kirshner explains how the crisis altered the international balance of power, affecting the patterns and pulse of world politics.



Capital as Will and Imagination
Schumpeter's Guide to the Postwar Japanese Miracle
Mark Metzler
Joseph Schumpeter is not thought of as a theorist of credit-supercharged high-speed growth, but that is what he became in postwar Japan. This new view helps also to explain Japan's bubble, and the global bubbles that have followed it.



Central Banks and Gold
How Tokyo, London, and New York Shaped the Modern World
Simon James Bytheway, Mark Metzler
Central bankers have enjoyed great power and autonomy. They have cooperated to construct and preserve towering structures of debt, reshaping relations of power and ownership around the world. In Central Banks and Gold, Simon James Bytheway and Mark Metzler explore how this financialized form of globalism first took shape a century ago.



Currency and Contest in East Asia
The Great Power Politics of Financial Regionalism
William W. Grimes
Grimes uses primary research and interviews with scores of participants and policy analysts to provide the most accurate, complete, and detailed description available of attempts to build financial cooperation among East Asian countries.



The Currency of Confidence
How Economic Beliefs Shape the IMF's Relationship with Its Borrowers
Stephen C. Nelson
The IMF is a purposive actor in world politics, primarily driven by a set of homogenous economic ideas, Stephen C. Nelson suggests in The Currency of Confidence, and its professional staff emerged from an insular set of American-trained economists.



Demanding Devaluation
Exchange Rate Politics in the Developing World
David A. Steinberg
In Demanding Devaluation, David Steinberg argues that the demands of powerful interest groups often dictate government decisions about the level of the exchange rate.



Developmental Mindset
The Revival of Financial Activism in South Korea
Elizabeth Thurbon
Thurbon offers a novel defense of the developmental state idea and a new framework for investigating the emergence and evolution of developmental states. She also canvasses the implications of the Korean experience for wider debates concerning the future of financial activism in an era of financialization, energy insecurity, and climate change.



A Europe Made of Money
The Emergence of the European Monetary System
Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol
Drawing on an extensive archival research from eighteen archives in six countries, this book makes a significant contribution to the understanding of European integration and the evolution of the world monetary system.



From Convergence to Crisis
Labor Markets and the Instability of the Euro
Alison Johnston
What explains Eurozone member-states' divergent exposure to Europe's sovereign debt crisis? Deviating from current fiscal and financial views, From Convergence to Crisis focuses on labor markets in a narrative that distinguishes the winners from the losers in the euro crisis.



The Future of the Dollar
For half a century, the United States has garnered substantial political and economic benefits as a result of the dollar's de facto role as a global currency. In recent years, however, the dollar's preponderant position in world markets has come under...



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