Collection : The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work

The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work explores the historical, social, political, and economic forces that shape health care work and organizations. Focusing on the work of professional and nonprofessional staff as well as family caregivers, the series illuminates how the culture of health care work affects the structuring of health policy and practice. In an increasingly global marketplace, the series also seeks to better understand the international context within which all health systems function. Looking at health policy and the health professions from a variety of perspectives, including first-person accounts, the series is aimed at a wide audience including those who work in health care, academics, policy makers, and professional organizations, as well as general readers.

Proposals and inquiries about the series should be sent to Suzanne Gordon (lsupport@comcast.net) or Sioban Nelson (dean.nursing@utoronto.ca)

Series Editors

Suzanne Gordon is an award-winning journalist whose work focuses on the health care work force, political culture, and women's issues. She is author of Life Support: Three Nurses on the Front Lines and Nursing against the Odds: How Health Care Cost Cutting, Media Stereotypes, and Medical Hubris Undermine Nurses and Patient Care, coauthor of Safety in Numbers: Nurse-to-Patient Ratios and the Future of Health Care and From Silence to Voice: What Nurses Know and Must Communicate to the Public, editor of When Chicken Soup Isn't Enough: Stories of Nurses Standing Up for Themselves, Their Patients, and Their Profession, and coeditor (with Sioban Nelson) of The Complexities of Care: Nursing Reconsidered.

Sioban Nelson is Dean and Professor at the Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Her books include, as coeditor, The Complexities of Care: Nursing Reconsidered and Notes on Nightingale: The Influence and Legacy of a Nursing Icon.

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The Challenge to Change
Reforming Health Care on the Front Line in the United States and the United Kingdom
Rebecca Kolins Givan
In The Challenge to Change, Rebecca Kolins Givan analyzes the successes and failures of efforts to improve hospitals and explains what factors make it likely that the implementation of reforms will rewarded by positive transformation in a particular institution's day-to-day operation.



Curing Medicare
A Doctor's View on How Our Health Care System Is Failing Older Americans and How We Can Fix It
Andy Lazris
Lazris offers straightforward solutions to ensure Medicare's solvency through sensible cost-effective plans that do not restrict patient choice or negate the doctor-patient relationship.



Deadly River
Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti
Ralph R. Frerichs
In Deadly River, Ralph R. Frerichs tells the story of the Haitian cholera epidemic, of a French disease detective determined to trace its origins so that he could help contain the spread and possibly eliminate the disease, and the political intrigue that has made that effort so difficult.



Hoping to Help
The Promises and Pitfalls of Global Health Volunteering
Judith N. Lasker
Hoping to Help is the first book to offer a comprehensive assessment of global health volunteering, based on research into how it currently operates, its benefits and drawbacks, and how it might be organized to contribute most effectively.



Voices in the Band
A Doctor, Her Patients, and How the Outlook on AIDS Care Changed from Doomed to Hopeful
Susan C. Ball
This unsentimental but moving memoir of bridges two distinct periods in the history of the AIDS epidemic: the terrifying early years in which a diagnosis was a death sentence and ignorance too often eclipsed compassion, and the introduction of antiviral therapies that transformed AIDS into a chronic, though potentially manageable, disease.



Collaborative Caring
Stories and Reflections on Teamwork in Health Care
Taking an unusual approach to the topic of medical teamwork, this book gathers fifty engaging first-person narratives provided by people from various health care professions.



Watch Your Back!
How the Back Pain Industry Is Costing Us More and Giving Us Less—and What You Can Do to Inform and Empower Yourself in Seeking Treatment
Richard A. Deyo
Dr. Richard A. Deyo, proposes an approach to managing back pain, which most adults in the United States experience at some point, that empowers the individual and leads more directly to effective care.



Creating the Health Care Team of the Future
The Toronto Model for Interprofessional Education and Practice
Sioban Nelson, Maria Tassone, Brian D. Hodges
This books shows how medical schools and teaching hospitals can implement the University of Toronto's successful model for interprofessional medical education, providing a step-by-step guide for deans, faculty, administrators, and health care providers.



Bedside Manners
Play and Workbook
Suzanne Gordon, Lisa Hayes, Scott Reeves
A play about workplace relations among physicians, nurses, others who work in health care, and patients—and how their interaction affects the quality of patient care, for better or worse.



Cleaning Up
How Hospital Outsourcing Is Hurting Workers and Endangering Patients
Dan Zuberi
Dan Zuberi looks at the consequences of outsourcing hospital cleaning and food preparation from two perspectives: its impact on patient safety and its role in increasing socioeconomic inequality.



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