Biography and Autobiography
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Not for Bread Alone
A Memoir
Moe Foner, Dan North
"Foner often let others take credit, but with his names and telephone numbers he was the man to call—and take a call from. He was a champion of civil rights and civil liberties and an early and strong opponent of the Vietnam War when that was...



The One, Other, and Only Dickens
Garrett Stewart
In The One, Other, and Only Dickens, Garrett Stewart casts new light on those delirious wrinkles of wording that are one of the chief pleasures of Dickens’s novels but that go regularly unnoticed in Dickensian criticism: the linguistic infrastructure of his textured prose. Stewart, in effect, looks over the reader’s shoulder in shared...



Ovid
The Poet and His Work
Niklas Holzberg
The Roman poet Ovid is enjoying a renaissance. Though relegated to the margins in the Romantic period, since the mid-1980s he has become popular again, not only with classicists and other lovers of ancient poetry, but also with poets and prose...



Parker Pillsbury
Radical Abolitionist, Male Feminist
Stacey M. Robertson
Parker Pillsbury—one of the most important and least examined antislavery activists of the nineteenth century—was a man of intense contradictions. Was he a disruptive eccentric who lashed out at authority (proclaiming Lincoln the worst president...



The Perraults
A Family of Letters in Early Modern France
Oded Rabinovitch
In The Perraults, Oded Rabinovitch takes the fascinating eponymous literary and scientific family as an entry point into the complex and rapidly changing world of early modern France. Today, the Perraults are best remembered for their canonical fairy tales, such as "Cinderella" and "Puss in Boots," most often attributed to Charles Perrault, one...



Raymond Roussel and the Republic of Dreams
Mark Ford
Raymond Roussel, one of the most outlandishly compelling literary figures of modern times, died in mysterious circumstances at the age of fifty-six in 1933. The story Mark Ford tells about Roussel's life and work is at once captivating, heartbreaking...



Reading Desire
In Pursuit of Ernest Hemingway
Debra A. Moddelmog
Whether revered for his masculinity, condemned as an icon of machismo, or perceived as possessing complex androgynous characteristics, Ernest Hemingway is acknowledged to be one of the most important twentieth-century American novelists. For Debra...



The Real Life of Mary Ann Evans
George Eliot, Her Letters and Fiction
Rosemarie Bodenheimer
Bodenheimer defines the personal paradoxes that helped to shape Eliot's fictional characters and narrative...



Reflections on Liszt
Alan Walker
"No one knows more about Franz Liszt than Alan Walker."—Malcolm Bowie, Times Literary Supplement In a series of lively essays that tell us much not only about the phenomenon that was Franz Liszt but also about the musical and cultural life...



The Revolution of ’28
Al Smith, American Progressivism, and the Coming of the New Deal
Robert Chiles
The Revolution of ’28 explores the career of New York governor and 1928 Democratic presidential nominee Alfred E. Smith. Robert Chiles peers into Smith’s work and uncovers a distinctive strain of American progressivism that resonated among urban, ethnic, working-class Americans in the early twentieth century. The book charts the rise of that...



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