Political Science > Political Science / Foreign Policy

   
<<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 >>>
    sort list by title


No Exit
America and the German Problem, 1943–1954
James McAllister
This new account of early Cold War history focuses on the emergence of a bipolar structure of power, the continuing importance of the German question, and American efforts to create a united Western...



Liberal Peace, Liberal War
American Politics and International Security
John M. Owen IV
Liberal democracies very rarely fight wars against each other, even though they go to war just as often as other types of states do. John M. Owen IV attributes this peculiar restraint to a synergy between liberal ideology and the institutions that...



National Interests in International Society
Martha Finnemore
How do states know what they want? Asking how interests are defined and how changes in them are accommodated, Martha Finnemore shows the fruitfulness of a constructivist approach to international politics. She draws on insights from sociological...



Ideas and Foreign Policy
Beliefs, Institutions, and Political Change



Black Earth, Red Star
A History of Soviet Security Policy, 1917–1991
R. Craig Nation
R. Craig Nation provides the first post-Cold War history of the Soviets' seventy-five-year struggle to maintain an effective national security policy in a hostile world without altogether abandoning the commitment to their original...



Myths of Empire
Domestic Politics and International Ambition
Jack Snyder
Overextension is the common pitfall of empires. Jack Snyder identifies recurrent myths of empire, describes the varieties of overextension to which they lead, and criticizes the traditional explanations offered by historians and political scientists.



The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution
Statecraft and the Prospect of Armageddon
Robert Jervis
Robert Jervis argues here that the possibility of nuclear war has created a revolution in military strategy and international relations. He examines how the potential for nuclear Armageddon has changed the meaning of war, the psychology of...



The Path to Vietnam
Origins of the American Commitment to Southeast Asia
Andrew J. Rotter
Andrew Rotter uncovers and analyzes the surprisingly complex reasons for America's fateful decision to provide economic and military aid to the nations of Southeast Asia in May...



The State and American Foreign Economic Policy
How has the U.S. government made the nation's foreign economic policy over the last hundred years? Social scientists have traditionally presented the American state as relatively weak, its policies as directly reflecting the domestic balance of...



Awkward Dominion
American Political, Economic, and Cultural Relations with Europe, 1919–1933
Frank Costigliola, Frank C. Costigliola
In Awkward Dominion, Frank Costigliola offers a striking interpretation of the emergence of the United States as a world power in the 1920s, a period in which the country faced both burdens and opportunities as a result of the First World...



<<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 >>>

Connect with us

Newsletters