Literature > Literary Theory and Criticism

   
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The Burdens of Perfection
On Ethics and Reading in Nineteenth-Century British Literature
Andrew H. Miller
A study of moral perfectionism in nineteenth-century British culture, this book reads a wide range of essayists, poets, and novelists through the lens of ethics and philosophy of mind.



Worldly Acts and Sentient Things
The Persistence of Agency from Stein to DeLillo
Robert Chodat, Robert A. Chodat
Chodat exposes a major shortcoming in recent accounts of twentieth-century discourse, arguing that what is often seen as the "death" of agency is better described as the displacement of agency onto new and varied...



Voicing American Poetry
Sound and Performance from the 1920s to the Present
Lesley Wheeler
The most interesting tensions and ambitions of twentieth-century American poetry intersect in one resonant word: voice. The term "poetic voice" emphasizes poetry's reliance on sound, which is prominent in ethnic American writings, new formalism, and...



On Deconstruction
Theory and Criticism after Structuralism
Jonathan Culler
With an emphasis on readers and reading, Jonathan Culler considered deconstruction in terms of the questions raised by psychoanalytic, feminist, and reader-response criticism. On Deconstruction is both an authoritative synthesis of Derrida's thought and an analysis of the often-problematic relation between his philosophical writings and the...



Paranoia and Modernity
Cervantes to Rousseau
John Farrell
"Don Quixote is the first great modern paranoid adventurer. . . . Grandiosity and persecution define the characters of Swift's Gulliver, Stendhal's Julien Sorel, Melville's Ahab, Dostoyevsky's Underground Man, Ibsen's Masterbuilder Solness...



Style Is Matter
The Moral Art of Vladimir Nabokov
Leland de la Durantaye
"How should we read Lolita? The beginning of an answer is that we should read it the way all great works deserve to be read: with attention and intelligence. But what sort of attention should we pay and what sort of intelligence should we apply to a...



The Self in Moral Space
Life Narrative and the Good
David B. Parker, David Parker
All of us take our moral bearings from a conception of the good, or a range of goods, that we consider most important. We are in this sense selves in moral space. Building on the work of the philosopher Charles Taylor, among others, David...



The Occult Mind
Magic in Theory and Practice
Christopher I. Lehrich
Through analyses of ley lines, the Tarot, the Corpus Hermeticum, and early attempts to decipher Egyptian hieroglyphics, Lehrich treats magic and its parts as an intellectual object that requires interpretive zeal.



The Iron Whim
A Fragmented History of Typewriting
Darren Wershler-Henry
The Iron Whim is an intelligent, irreverent, and humorous history of writing culture and technology. It covers the early history and evolution of the typewriter as well as the various attempts over the years to change the keyboard configuration, but...



The Enlargement of Life
Moral Imagination at Work
John Kekes
Moral imagination, according to John Kekes, is indispensable to a fulfilling and responsible life. By correcting a parochial view of the possibilities available to us and overcoming mistaken assumptions about our limitations, moral...



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