History > History / U.S. and Canada


Journals and Collections
· American Institutions and Society

   
<<< 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 >>>
    sort list by title


Under the Strain of Color
Harlem's Lafargue Clinic and the Promise of an Antiracist Psychiatry
Gabriel N. Mendes
Recapturing the history of a largely forgotten New York City institution that embodied new ways of thinking about mental health, race, and the substance of citizenship. Harlem's Lafargue Mental Hygiene Clinic was founded in 1946.



Recapturing the Oval Office
New Historical Approaches to the American Presidency
Contributors forge an agenda for returning the study of the presidency to the mainstream practice of history, charting how the study of the presidency can be integrated into historical narratives that combine rich analyses of political, social, and cultural history.



Suffrage Reconstructed
Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War Era
Laura E. Free
Suffrage Reconstructed offers a new interpretation of the Civil War–era remaking of American democracy, placing African American activists and women's rights advocates at the heart of nineteenth-century American conversations about public policy, civil rights, and the franchise.



Deceit on the Road to War
Presidents, Politics, and American Democracy
John M. Schuessler
In Deceit on the Road to War, John M. Schuessler examines how U.S. presidents have deceived the American public about fundamental decisions of war and peace. Deception has been deliberate, he suggests, as presidents have sought to shift blame for war onto others in some cases and oversell its benefits in others.



Christian Imperialism
Converting the World in the Early American Republic
Emily Conroy-Krutz
In describing how American missionaries interacted with a range of foreign locations (including India, Liberia, the Middle East, the Pacific Islands, North America, and Singapore) and imperial contexts, Christian Imperialism provides a new perspective on how Americans thought of their country's role in the world.



A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden
The Story of the Philosophers' Camp in the Adirondacks
James Schlett
In A Not too Greatly Changed Eden, James Schlett recounts the story of the 1858 Philosophers' Camp at Follensby Pond in the Adirondacks, from the lives and careers of—and friendships and frictions among—the participants to the extensive preparations for the expedition and the several-day encampment to its lasting legacy.



Brethren by Nature
New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery
Margaret Ellen Newell
In Brethren by Nature, Margaret Ellen Newell reveals a little-known aspect of American history: English colonists in New England enslaved thousands of Indians.



Unbuttoning America
A Biography of "Peyton Place"
Ardis Cameron
In this lively account of the writing, publication, and legacy of the 1956 bestselling novel, "Peyton Place," Ardis Cameron tells how the story of a patricide in a small New England village became a cultural phenomenon.



The Origins of Right to Work
Antilabor Democracy in Nineteenth-Century Chicago
Cedric de Leon
Cedric de Leon traces the antagonism between pro-business politicians and labor to the Northern victory in the U.S. Civil War, when the political establishment equated collective bargaining with the enslavement of free white men.



Forgotten Men and Fallen Women
The Cultural Politics of New Deal Narratives
Holly Allen
Holly Allen explores popular and official narratives of forgotten manhood, fallen womanhood, and other social and moral archetypes during the Great Depression and the Second World War.



<<< 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 >>>

Connect with us

Newsletters