Political Science > Political Science / Foreign Policy

   
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Hierarchy in International Relations
David A. Lake
International relations are generally understood as a realm of anarchy in which countries lack any superior authority and interact within a Hobbesian state of nature. In Hierarchy in International Relations, David A. Lake challenges this traditional...



Channels of Power
The UN Security Council and U.S. Statecraft in Iraq
Alexander Thompson
Thompson surveys U.S. policy toward Iraq, starting with the Gulf War, continuing through the interwar years of sanctions and coercive disarmament, and concluding with the 2003 invasion and its long aftermath.



The Power Problem
How American Military Dominance Makes Us Less Safe, Less Prosperous, and Less Free
Christopher A. Preble
Preble explores the aims, costs, and limitations of the use of this nation's military power and argues that the possession of vast military strength runs contrary to the original intent of the Founders--and serves to undermine the country.



Eurasia's New Frontiers
Young States, Old Societies, Open Futures
Thomas W. Simons
As a global power, the United States will always be interested in Eurasia and engaged with its peoples and nations. Eurasia is too large and important a part of the world to be ignored. It casts a shadow of the old Soviet threat forward in time, and...



Just Politics
Human Rights and the Foreign Policy of Great Powers
C. William Walldorf
Walldorf argues that Western governments can and must integrate human rights into their foreign policies. Failure to take humanitarian concerns into account, he contends, will only damage their long-term strategic objectives.



The End of the West?
Crisis and Change in the Atlantic Order
Are we witnessing a deepening transatlantic rift between the U.S. and the nationals of western Europe, with wide-ranging consequences for the future of world order? This volume examines core structural features of the transatlantic order to determine whether current disagreements are transient or permanent.



The Ideological Origins of Great Power Politics, 1789–1989
Mark L. Haas
How do leaders perceive threat levels in world politics, and what effects do those perceptions have on policy choices? Mark L. Haas focuses on how ideology shapes perception. He does not delineate the content of particular ideologies, but rather the...



Calculating Credibility
How Leaders Assess Military Threats
Daryl G. Press
Calculating Credibility examines—and ultimately rejects—a fundamental belief held by laypeople and the makers of American foreign policy: the notion that backing down during a crisis reduces a country's future credibility. Fear of diminished...



Rethinking the World
Great Power Strategies and International Order
Jeffrey W. Legro
Stunning shifts in the worldviews of states mark the modern history of international affairs: how do societies think about—and rethink—international order and security? Japan's "opening," German conquest, American internationalism, Maoist...



Anti-Americanisms in World Politics
A distinguished group of experts, including historians, polling data analysts, political scientists, anthropologists, and sociologists, to explore global anti-Americanism in depth, using both qualitative and quantitative methods.



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