Literature > Literary Theory and Criticism

   
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Aggressive Fictions
Reading the Contemporary American Novel
Kathryn Hume
Looking beyond the theory-based justifications that critics often provide for such fiction, Hume offers a commonsense guide for the average reader who wants to better understand and appreciate books that might otherwise seem difficult to enjoy.



Impious Fidelity
Anna Freud, Psychoanalysis, Politics
Suzanne Stewart-Steinberg
Stewart-Steinberg investigates the legacy of Anna Freud at the intersection between psychoanalysis as a mode of thinking and theorizing and its existence as a political entity.



Bureau of Missing Persons
Writing the Secret Lives of Fathers
Roger J. Porter
Analyzing contemporary narratives of the secret lives led by writers' fathers.



What Else Is Pastoral?
Renaissance Literature and the Environment
Ken Hiltner
A corrective to the prevailing interpretation of pastoral poetry that shows the value of reading literature ecologically.



The Social Life of Fluids
Blood, Milk, and Water in the Victorian Novel
Jules Law
Analyzing the expression of scientific understanding and the technological manipulation of fluids—blood, breast milk, and water—in Victorian novels, Law traces the culture's growing anxiety about fluids from the 1830s through the 1890s.



Paradigms for a Metaphorology
Hans Blumenberg
What role do metaphors play in philosophical language? Are they impediments to clear thinking that should be eradicated in the interests of terminological exactness? Or can they be used by philosophers to indicate the attitudes that regulate an...



Global Matters
The Transnational Turn in Literary Studies
Paul Jay
Global Matters provides a concise, informative overview of theoretical, critical, and curricular issues driving the transnational turn in literary studies and how these issues have come to dominate contemporary global fiction as well.



Melting-Pot Modernism
Sarah Wilson
"An intelligent and beautifully written examination of the 'melting pot' as taken up in the work of four modernist writers: Henry James, James Weldon Johnson, Willa Cather, and Gertrude Stein."—Christopher Douglas, University of Victoria



The Enlargement of Life
Moral Imagination at Work
John Kekes
Moral imagination, according to John Kekes, is indispensable to a fulfilling and responsible life. By correcting a parochial view of the possibilities available to us and overcoming mistaken assumptions about our limitations, moral imagination...



Deep Skin
Elizabeth Bishop and Visual Art
Peggy Samuels
Elizabeth Bishop, who constructed poems of crystalline visual accuracy, is often regarded as the most painterly of twentieth-century American poets. In Deep Skin, Peggy Samuels explores Bishop's attraction to painters who experimented with dynamic...



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