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14/18—Rupture or Continuity
Belgian Art around World War I
World War I had a major effect on Belgian visual arts. German occupation, the horror at the battlefield and the experience of exile, led to multiple narratives and artistic expressions by Belgian artists during and after the war. Belgian interbellum art is extremely vibrant and diverse. 14/18 – Rupture or Continuity takes a look at Belgian...



Migration and Integration in Flanders
Multidisciplinary Perspectives
Across the world, and due to ongoing globalization, migration is increasingly becoming a part of daily life. But more than ever, migration can no longer be viewed as a simple linear trajectory from A to B. The emergence of transnational communities and intense interactions between regions of origin and of destination have led to new forms of...



Venice's Intimate Empire
Family Life and Scholarship in the Renaissance Mediterranean
Erin Maglaque
Mining private writings and humanist texts, Erin Maglaque explores the lives and careers of two Venetian noblemen, Giovanni Bembo and Pietro Coppo, who were appointed as colonial administrators and governors. In Venice’s Intimate Empire, she uses these two men and their families to showcase the relationship between humanism, empire, and family...



The Teahouse under Socialism
The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000
Di Wang
To understand a city fully, writes Di Wang, we must observe its most basic units of social life. In The Teahouse under Socialism, Wang does just that, arguing that the teahouses of Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, are some of the most important public spaces—perfect sites for examining the social and economic activities of everyday...



Light without Heat
The Observational Mood from Bacon to Milton
David Carroll Simon
In Light without Heat, David Carroll Simon argues for the importance of carelessness to the literary and scientific experiments of the seventeenth century. While scholars have often looked to this period in order to narrate the triumph of methodical rigor as a quintessentially modern intellectual value, Simon describes the appeal of open-ended...



Intimate Violence
Anti-Jewish Pogroms on the Eve of the Holocaust
Jeffrey S. Kopstein, Jason Wittenberg
Why do pogroms occur in some localities and not in others? Jeffrey S. Kopstein and Jason Wittenberg examine a particularly brutal wave of violence that occurred across hundreds of predominantly Polish and Ukrainian communities in the aftermath of the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union. The authors note that while some communities erupted in...



Troubled Waters
Insecurity in the Persian Gulf
Mehran Kamrava
Troubled Waters looks at four dynamics in the Persian Gulf that have contributed to making the region one of the most volatile and tension-filled spots in the world. Mehran Kamrava identifies the four dynamics as: the neglect of human dimensions of security, the inherent instability involved in reliance on the United States and the exclusion of...



The Poison Plot
A Tale of Adultery and Murder in Colonial Newport
Elaine Forman Crane
An accusation of attempted murder rudely interrupted Mary Arnold’s dalliances with working men and her extensive shopping sprees. When her husband Benedict fell deathly ill and then asserted she had tried to kill him with poison, the result was a dramatic petition for divorce. The case before the Rhode Island General Assembly and its tumultuous...



Our Frontier Is the World
The Boy Scouts in the Age of American Ascendancy
Mischa Honeck
Mischa Honeck’s Our Frontier Is the World is a provocative account of how the Boy Scouts echoed and enabled American global expansion in the twentieth century.The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has long been a standard bearer for national identity. The core values of the organization have, since its founding in 1910, shaped what it means to be an...



History Is a Contemporary Literature
Manifesto for the Social Sciences
Ivan Jablonka
Ivan Jablonka’s History Is a Contemporary Literature offers highly innovative perspectives on the writing of history, the relationship between literature and the social sciences, and the way that both social-scientific inquiry and literary explorations contribute to our understanding of the world. Jablonka argues that the act and art of...



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