Social Science > Urban Studies

   
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Fighting Westway
Environmental Law, Citizen Activism, and the Regulatory War That Transformed New York City
William W. Buzbee
This informative narrative of environmental, political, and legal conflict describes what really happened during the battles over the Westway highway project, providing a new understanding of how modern legal frameworks shape high stakes regulatory...



Food Co-ops in America
Communities, Consumption, and Economic Democracy
Anne Meis Knupfer
This book examines the economic and democratic ideals of food cooperatives, showing what the histories of food co-ops tells us about our rights as consumers, how we can practice democracy and community, and how we might do business differently.



Foreclosed
High-Risk Lending, Deregulation, and the Undermining of America's Mortgage Market
Dan Immergluck, Daniel Immergluck
Foreclosed explains the rise of high-risk lending in the 1990s and early 200s and why these newer types of loans—and their associated regulatory infrastructure—failed in substantial ways, leading to the economic collapse of...



From Flux to Frame
Designing Infrastructure and Shaping Urbanization in Belgium
Maarten Van Acker
Bridging the gap between urban planning and transport history, this book investigates the spatial impact of highways, motorways, canals, tramways, and railways on the surrounding landscape.



From Miracle to Mirage
The Making and Unmaking of the Korean Middle Class, 1960-2015
Myungji Yang
Myungji Yang’s From Miracle to Mirage is a critical account of the trajectory of state-sponsored middle-class formation in Korea in the second half of the twentieth century. Yang’s book offers a compelling story of the reality behind the myth of middle-class formation. Capturing the emergence, reproduction, and fragmentation of the Korean...



From Ruins to Reconstruction
Urban Identity in Soviet Sevastopol after World War II
Karl D. Qualls
Based on extensive research in archives in both Moscow and Sevastopol, architectural plans and drawings, interviews, and his own extensive experience in Sevastopol, Qualls tells a unique story in which the periphery "bests" the Stalinist...



From the Outside In
Suburban Elites, Third-Sector Organizations, and the Reshaping of Philadelphia
Carolyn T. Adams
Carolyn T. Adams addresses the role of suburban elites in setting development agendas for urban municipalities and their larger metropolitan regions. She shows how major nongovernmental, nonmarket institutions are taking responsibility for reshaping...



The Future of Us All
Race and Neighborhood Politics in New York City
Roger Sanjek
Before the next century is out, Americans of African, Asian, and Latin American ancestry will outnumber those of European origin. In the Elmhurst-Corona neighborhood of Queens, New York City, the transition occurred during the 1970s, and the area's...



The Geopolitics of Spectacle
Space, Synecdoche, and the New Capitals of Asia
Natalie Koch
Why do autocrats build spectacular new capital cities? In The Geopolitics of Spectacle, Natalie Koch considers how autocratic rulers use "spectacular" projects to shape state-society relations, but rather than focus on the standard approach—on the project itself—she considers the unspectacular "others." The contrasting views of those from the...



"Getting Paid"
Youth Crime and Work in the Inner City
Mercer L. Sullivan
The working class in New York City was remade in the mid-nineteenth century. In the 1820s a substantial majority of city artisans were native-born; by the 1850s three-quarters of the city's laboring men and women were immigrants. How did the influx of this large group of young adults affect the city's working class? What determined the texture...



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