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Healing Identities
Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups
Cynthia Burack
Group identifications famously pose the problem of destructive rhetoric and action against others. Cynthia Burack brings together the theory work of women of color and the tools of psychoanalysis to examine the effects of group collaborations...



Hearing Allah’s Call
Preaching and Performance in Indonesian Islam
Julian Millie
Hearing Allah’s Call changes the way we think about Islamic communication. In the city of Bandung in Indonesia, sermons are not reserved for mosques and sites for Friday prayers. Muslim speakers are in demand for all kinds of events, from rites of passage to motivational speeches for companies and other organizations. Julian Millie spent...



Her Father’s Daughter
Gender, Power, and Religion in the Early Spanish Kingdoms
Lucy K. Pick
"In Her Father’s Daughter, Lucy K. Pick looks to a much-neglected aspect of the history of the Spanish kingdoms in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Her book is novel and original."—Teofilo Ruiz, author of A King Travels"Her Father’s Daughter will contribute to and enrich ongoing discussions regarding the role and evolution of the medieval...



The Hungry Steppe
Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan
Sarah Cameron
The Hungry Steppe examines one of the most heinous crimes of the Stalinist regime, the Kazakh famine of 1930–33. More than 1.5 million people perished in this famine, a quarter of Kazakhstan’s population, and the crisis transformed a territory the size of continental Europe. Yet the story of this famine has remained mostly hidden from...



Imagining World Order
Literature and International Law in Early Modern Europe, 1500–1800
Chenxi Tang
In early modern Europe, international law emerged as a means of governing relations between rapidly consolidating sovereign states, purporting to establish a normative order for the perilous international world. However, it was intrinsically fragile and uncertain, for sovereign states had no acknowledged common authority that would create...



Improvisational Islam
Indonesian Youth in a Time of Possibility
Nur Amali Ibrahim
Improvisational Islam is about novel and unexpected ways of being Muslim, where religious dispositions are achieved through techniques that have little or no precedent in classical Islamic texts or concepts. Nur Amali Ibrahim foregrounds two distinct autodidactic university student organizations, each trying to envision alternative ways of...



In Search of the Free Individual
The History of the Russian-Soviet Soul
Svetlana Alexievich
"I love life in its living form, life that’s found on the street, in human conversations, shouts, and moans." So begins this speech delivered in Russian at Cornell University by Svetlana Alexievich, winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature. In poetic language, Alexievich traces the origins of her deeply affecting blend of journalism, oral...



Indonesia Journal
October 1990



Indonesia Journal
October 1998



Indonesia Journal
April 2016



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