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The Iron Whim
A Fragmented History of Typewriting
Darren Wershler-Henry
The Iron Whim is an intelligent, irreverent, and humorous history of writing culture and technology. It covers the early history and evolution of the typewriter as well as the various attempts over the years to change the keyboard configuration, but...



Laboratories of Faith
Mesmerism, Spiritism, and Occultism in Modern France
John Warne Monroe
An evocative history of alternative religious practices in France in the second half of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries that tells the interconnected stories of three movements: Mesmerism, Spiritism, and...



Light without Heat
The Observational Mood from Bacon to Milton
David Carroll Simon
In Light without Heat, David Carroll Simon argues for the importance of carelessness to the literary and scientific experiments of the seventeenth century. While scholars have often looked to this period in order to narrate the triumph of methodical rigor as a quintessentially modern intellectual value, Simon describes the appeal of open-ended...



Machines as the Measure of Men
Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance
Michael Adas
Over the past five centuries, advances in Western understanding of and control over the material world have strongly influenced European responses to non-Western peoples and cultures. In Machines as the Measure of Men, Michael Adas explores the ways in which European perceptions of their scientific and technological superiority shaped their...



Managing the Human Factor
The Early Years of Human Resource Management in American Industry
Bruce E. Kaufman
Human resource departments are key components in the people management system of nearly every medium-to-large organization in the industrial world. They provide a wide range of essential services relating to employees, including recruitment...



The Matter of Revolution
Science, Poetry, and Politics in the Age of Milton
John H. Rogers
John Rogers here addresses the literary and ideological consequences of the remarkable, if improbable, alliance between science and politics in seventeenth-century England. He looks at the cultural intersection between the English and Scientific...



The Maxwellians
Bruce J. Hunt
James Clerk Maxwell published the Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism in 1873. At his death, six years later, his theory of the electromagnetic field was neither well understood nor widely accepted. By the mid-1890s, however, it was regarded as one...



Militarism in a Global Age
Naval Ambitions in Germany and the United States before World War I
Dirk Bönker
Dirk Bönker explores the far-reaching ambitions of German and U.S. naval officers before World War I as they advanced navalism, a particular brand of modern militarism that stressed the paramount importance of sea power.



The Mirror, the Window, and the Telescope
How Renaissance Linear Perspective Changed Our Vision of the Universe
Samuel Y. Edgerton
Edgerton shows how linear perspective emerged in early fifteenth-century Florence out of an artistic and religious context in which devout Christians longed for divine presence in their daily lives and ultimately undermined medieval Christian cosmology.



Mission and Science
Missiology Revised/Missiologie revisitée, 1850–1940
Mission & Science deals with the interaction between new scientific disciplines (historiography, geography, ethnology, anthropology, linguistics) and new scientific insights (Darwin's evolutionary theory, heliocentrism), as well as the role of the papacy and what inspired missionary practice (first in China and the Far East and later in Africa).



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