Interdisciplinary Studies > Cultural Studies

   
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Standards and Their Stories
How Quantifying, Classifying, and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life
Standardization is one of the defining aspects of modern life, its presence so pervasive that it is usually taken for granted. However cumbersome, onerous, or simply puzzling certain standards may be, their fundamental purpose in streamlining...



Family Likeness
Sex, Marriage, and Incest from Jane Austen to Virginia Woolf
Mary Jean Corbett
Corbett shows how the domestic fiction of novelists including Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Virginia Woolf reflected the shifting boundaries of "family" and even helped refine those borders.



The Punished Self
Surviving Slavery in the Colonial South
Alex Bontemps
The Punished Self describes enslavement in the American South during the eighteenth century as a systematic assault on Blacks' sense of self.



Magnetic Appeal
MRI and the Myth of Transparency
Kelly A. Joyce
Offers an in-depth exploration of the science and culture of MRI, examining its development and emergence as an imaging technology, its popular appeal and acceptance, and its current use in health care.



Overkill
Sex and Violence in Contemporary Russian Popular Culture
Eliot Borenstein
Borenstein argues that the popular cultural products consumed in the post-perestroika era were more than just diversions; they allowed Russians to indulge their despair over economic woes and everyday threats.



Metropolis on the Styx
The Underworlds of Modern Urban Culture, 1800–2001
David L. Pike
In Metropolis on the Styx,David L. Pike considers how underground spaces and their many myths have organized ways of seeing, thinking about, and living in the modern city. Expanding on the cultural history of underground construction in his acclaimed...



The Deceivers
Art Forgery and Identity in the Nineteenth Century
Aviva Briefel
The nineteenth century witnessed an unprecedented increase in art forgery, caused both by the advent of national museums and by a rapidly growing bourgeois interest in collecting objects from the past. This rise had profound repercussions on notions...



Lost Bodies
Inhabiting the Borders of Life and Death
Laura E. Tanner
"If the dying body makes us flinch and look away, struggling not to see what we have seen, the lost body disappears from cultural view, buried along with the sensory traces of its corporeal presence."—from the Introduction American popular culture...



Victorian Interpretation
Suzy Anger
Anger's book demonstrates that much current thought on interpretation has its antecedents in the Victorians, who were already deeply engaged with the problems of interpretation that concern literary theorists today.



Subterranean Cities
The World beneath Paris and London, 1800–1945
David L. Pike
The underground has been a dominant image of modern life since the late eighteenth century. A site of crisis, fascination, and hidden truth, the underground is a space at once more immediate and more threatening than the ordinary world above. In...



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