Social Science > Gender and Sexuality Studies

   
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The Law of Kinship
Anthropology, Psychoanalysis, and the Family in France
Camille Robcis
In this highly original book, Camille Robcis seeks to explain why and how academic discourses on kinship have intersected and overlapped with political debates on the family—and on the nature of French republicanism itself.



The Pathological Family
Postwar America and the Rise of Family Therapy
Deborah Weinstein
The Pathological Family examines how family therapy developed against the intellectual and cultural landscape of postwar America.



Hidden Hunger
Gender and the Politics of Smarter Foods
Aya Hirata Kimura
Kimura explores the recent emphasis on micronutrients and smart foods within the international development community and, in particular, how the voices of women were silenced despite their expertise in food purchasing and preparation.



Buoyancy on the Bayou
Shrimpers Face the Rising Tide of Globalization
Jill Ann Harrison
Portrays the struggles that Louisiana shrimp fishers endure to remain afloat in an industry beset by globalization.



Gender and Christianity in Modern Europe
Beyond the Feminization Thesis



Balkan Smoke
Tobacco and the Making of Modern Bulgaria
Mary C. Neuburger
In writing the life of tobacco in Bulgaria from the late Ottoman period through the years of Communist rule, Neuburger gives us much more than the cultural history of a commodity; she provides a fresh perspective on the genesis of modern Bulgaria itself.



Queen of Vaudeville
The Story of Eva Tanguay
Andrew L. Erdman
Queen of Vaudeville is the first-ever biography of Eva Tanguay, the most famous star of the American vaudeville theater and perhaps the most popular live entertainer in the United States from about 1910 to 1920.



Mere Equals
The Paradox of Educated Women in the Early American Republic
Lucia McMahon
McMahon narrates a story about how a generation of young women who enjoyed access to new educational opportunities made sense of their individual and social identities in an American nation marked by stark political inequality between the sexes.



She Hath Been Reading
Women and Shakespeare Clubs in America
Katherine West Scheil
In the late nineteenth century hundreds of clubs formed across the United States devoted to the reading of Shakespeare. Katherine West Scheil uncovers this hidden layer of intellectual activity that flourished in American society.



Putting the Barn Before the House
Women and Family Farming in Early Twentieth-Century New York
Grey Osterud
Putting the Barn Before the House features the voices and viewpoints of women born before World War I who lived on family farms in south-central New York. Grey Osterud explores the flexible and varied ways that families shared labor.



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