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Harvests, Feasts, and Graves
Postcultural Consciousness in Contemporary Papua New Guinea
Ryan Schram
Ryan Schram explores the experiences of living in intercultural and historical conjunctures among Auhelawa people of Papua New Guinea in Harvests, Feasts, and Graves. In this ethnographic investigation, Schram ponders how Auhelawa question the meaning of social forms and through this questioning seek paths to establish a new sense of their...



Why Terrorists Quit
The Disengagement of Indonesian Jihadists
Julie Chernov Hwang
Why do hard-line terrorists decide to leave their organizations and quit the world of terror and destruction? This is the question for which Julie Chernov Hwang seeks answers in Why Terrorists Quit.Over the course of six years Chernov Hwang conducted more than one hundred interviews with current and former leaders and followers of radical...



Research in Outdoor Education
Volume 15
Research in Outdoor Education is a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal seeking to support and further outdoor education and its goals, including personal growth and moral development, team building and cooperation, outdoor knowledge and skill development, environmental awareness, education and enrichment, and research that directly supports...



The One-Way Street of Integration
Fair Housing and the Pursuit of Racial Justice in American Cities
Edward G. Goetz
The One-Way Street of Integration examines two contrasting housing policy approaches to achieving racial justice. Integration initiatives and community development efforts have been for decades contrasting means of achieving racial equity through housing policy. Edward G. Goetz doesn’t see the solution to racial injustice as the government...



Limits to Decolonization
Indigeneity, Territory, and Hydrocarbon Politics in the Bolivian Chaco
Penelope Anthias
Penelope Anthias’s Limits to Decolonization addresses one of the most important issues in contemporary indigenous politics: struggles for territory. Based on the experience of thirty-six Guaraní communities in the Bolivian Chaco, Anthias reveals how two decades of indigenous mapping and land titling have failed to reverse a historical...



From Miracle to Mirage
The Making and Unmaking of the Korean Middle Class, 1960-2015
Myungji Yang
Myungji Yang’s From Miracle to Mirage is a critical account of the trajectory of state-sponsored middle-class formation in Korea in the second half of the twentieth century. Yang’s book offers a compelling story of the reality behind the myth of middle-class formation. Capturing the emergence, reproduction, and fragmentation of the Korean...



Undoing Work, Rethinking Community
A Critique of the Social Function of Work
James A. Chamberlain
This revolutionary book presents a new conception of community and the struggle against capitalism. In Undoing Work, Rethinking Community, James A. Chamberlain argues that paid work and the civic duty to perform it substantially undermines freedom and justice. Chamberlain believes that to seize back our time and transform our society, we must...



Svay
A Khmer Village in Cambodia
May Mayko Ebihara
May Mayko Ebihara (1934–2005) was the first American anthropologist to conduct ethnographic research in Cambodia. Svay provides a remarkably detailed picture of individual villagers and of Khmer social structure and kinship, agriculture, politics, and religion. The world Ebihara described would soon be shattered by Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge. Fifty...



Sexual Politics and Feminist Science
Women Sexologists in Germany, 1900–1933
Kirsten Leng
In Sexual Politics and Feminist Science, Kirsten Leng restores the work of female sexologists to the forefront of the history of sexology. While male researchers who led the practice of early-twentieth-century sexology viewed women and their sexuality as objects to be studied, not as collaborators in scientific investigation, Leng pinpoints...



Rare Earth Frontiers
From Terrestrial Subsoils to Lunar Landscapes
Julie Michelle Klinger
Rare Earth Frontiers is a work of human geography that serves to demystify the powerful elements that make possible the miniaturization of electronics, green energy and medical technologies, and essential telecommunications and defense systems. Julie Michelle Klinger draws attention to the fact that the rare earths we rely on most are as common...



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