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Between Homeland and Motherland
Africa, U.S. Foreign Policy, and Black Leadership in America
Alvin B. Tillery
The history of African American political engagement with Africa, from back-to-Africa movements to the anti-apartheid campaign.



Beyond the Household
Women's Place in the Early South, 1700–1835
Cynthia A. Kierner
Much has been written about the "southern lady," that pervasive and enduring icon of antebellum regional identity. But how did the lady get on her pedestal—and were the lives of white southern women always so different from those of their northern...



Beyond the Ruins
The Meanings of Deindustrialization
The immediate impact of deindustrialization—the suffering inflicted upon workers, their families, and their communities—has been widely reported by scholars and journalists. In this important volume, the authors seek to move discussion of America's...



Black Freedom Fighters in Steel
The Struggle for Democratic Unionism
Ruth Needleman
Thousands of African Americans poured into northwest Indiana in the 1920s dreaming of decent-paying jobs and a life without Klansmen, chain gangs, and cotton. Black Freedom Fighters in Steel: The Struggle for Democratic Unionism by Ruth Needleman...



Black Lung
Anatomy of a Public Health Disaster
Alan Derickson
In the definitive history of a twentieth-century public health disaster, Alan Derickson recounts how, for decades, the combined failure of government, medicine, and industry to halt the spread of black lung disease—and even to acknowledge its existence—resulted in a national tragedy, the effects of which are still being felt.



Black Power at Work
Community Control, Affirmative Action, and the Construction Industry
Black Power at Work chronicles the history of direct action campaigns to open up the construction industry to black workers in the 1960s and 1970s, with case studies of Brooklyn, Newark, the Bay Area, Detroit, Chicago, and Seattle.



Black Yanks in the Pacific
Race in the Making of American Military Empire after World War II
Michael Cullen Green
By the end of World War II, many black citizens viewed service in the segregated American armed forces with distaste if not disgust. Meanwhile, domestic racism and Jim Crow, ongoing Asian struggles against European colonialism, and prewar calls for...



Bonds of Community
The Lives of Farm Women in Nineteenth-Century New York
Nancy Osterud
Women held a central place in long-settled rural communities like the Nanticoke Valley in upstate New York during the late nineteenth century. Their lives were limited by the bonds of kinship and labor, but farm women found strength in these bonds as...



Books As Weapons
Propaganda, Publishing, and the Battle for Global Markets in the Era of World War II
John B. Hench
Only weeks after the D-Day invasion of June 6, 1944, a surprising cargo—crates of books—joined the flood of troop reinforcements, weapons and ammunition, food, and medicine onto Normandy beaches. The books were destined for French bookshops, to be...



Brabbling Women
Disorderly Speech and the Law in Early Virginia
Terri L. Snyder
Terri L. Snyder demonstrates how women resisted and challenged oppressive political, legal, and cultural practices in colonial Virginia.



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