Philosophy > History of Philosophy

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Kant's Rational Theology
Allen W. Wood
This book explores Kant's views on the concept of God and on the attempt to demonstrate God's existence as a means of understanding Kant's work as a whole and of achieving a proper appreciation of the contents of Kant's moral faith.

Giambattista Vico: Keys to the "New Science"
Translations, Commentaries, and Essays
Giambattista Vico
Brings together in one volume translations, commentaries, and essays that illuminate the background of Giambattista Vico's major work.

Primary "Ousia"
An Essay on Aristotle's Metaphysics Z and H
Michael J. Loux
Michael J. Loux here presents a fresh reading of two of the most important books of the Metaphysics, Books Z and H, in which Aristotle presents his mature theory of primary substances (ousiai). Focusing on the interplay of Aristotle's early and late...

Hegel and the Hermetic Tradition
Glenn Alexander Magee
Glenn Alexander Magee's pathbreaking book argues that Hegel was decisively influenced by the Hermetic tradition, a body of thought with roots in Greco-Roman Egypt. Magee traces the influence on Hegel of such Hermetic thinkers as Baader, Böhme, Bruno...

Platonic Stoicism
The Dialogue between Platonism and Stoicism in Antiquity
Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, Series 1, No. 39 This book examines the important but largely neglected issue of the intricate mutual influences between Platonism and Stoicism in the Hellenistic period, the Imperial Age, and after. Although this...

The Concept of Love in 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
"Love is joy with the accompanying idea of an external cause." Spinoza's definition of love manifests a major paradigm shift achieved by seventeenth-century Europe, in which the emotions, formerly seen as normative "forces of nature," were embraced by...

A Commentary on Plutarch's "De latenter vivendo"
Geert Roskam
In this book, Plutarch's anti-Epicurean polemic is understood against the background of the previous philosophical tradition.

On Providence
The universe is, as it were, one machine, wherein the celestial spheres are analogous to the interlocking wheels and the particular beings are like the things moved by the wheels and all events are determined by an inescapable necessity. To speak of...

On Plato's "Cratylus"
Proclus' commentary on Plato's Cratylus is the only ancient commentary on this work to have come down to us, and is illuminating in two special ways. First, it is actually the work of two Neoplatonists. The majority of the material is supplied by the...

Henrici de Gandavo Quodlibet XV
Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, Series 2, No. 20 The sixteen questions in Henry of Ghent's Quodlibet XV treat a range of issues—the immaculate conception, the omnipotence of God, the nature of an "instance," the absolute and ordained powers of the...

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