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· Indonesia Journal
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Indonesia Journal
April 2016



Interpretive Conventions
The Reader in the Study of American Fiction
Steven Mailloux
In Interpretive Conventions, Steven Mailloux examines five influential theories of the reading process—those of Stanley Fish, Jonathan Culler, Wolfgang Iser, Norman Holland, and David...



Joyce
The Return of the Repressed
Did James Joyce, that icon of modernity, spearhead the dismantling of the Cartesian subject? Or was he a supreme example of a modern man forever divided and never fully known to himself? This volume reads the dialogue of contradictory cultural voices in Joyce’s works—revolutionary and reactionary, critical and subject to critique, marginal and...



Language as Hermeneutic
A Primer on the Word and Digitization
Walter J. Ong
Language in all its modes—oral, written, print, electronic—claims the central role in Walter J. Ong’s acclaimed speculations on human culture. After his death, his archives were found to contain unpublished drafts of a final book manuscript that Ong envisioned as a distillation of his life’s work. This first publication of Language as...



Language of Power
Feasting and Gift-Giving in Medieval Iceland and Its Sagas
Vidar Palsson, Viðar Pálsson
Viðar Pálsson addresses pre-modern European power relationships that provide the context for narratives of feasts and exchanges of gifts so conspicuous in the Icelandic sagas.



Light without Heat
The Observational Mood from Bacon to Milton
David Carroll Simon
In Light without Heat, David Carroll Simon argues for the importance of carelessness to the literary and scientific experiments of the seventeenth century. While scholars have often looked to this period in order to narrate the triumph of methodical rigor as a quintessentially modern intellectual value, Simon describes the appeal of open-ended...



Madame Bovary on Trial
Dominick LaCapra
In 1857, following the publication of Madame Bovary, Flaubert was charged with having committed an "outrage to public morality and religion." Dominick LaCapra, an intellectual historian with wide-ranging literary interests, here examines this remarkable...



Margery Kempe and the Lonely Reader
Rebecca Krug
In Margery Kempe and the Lonely Reader, Rebecca Krug shows how and why Kempe wrote her Book, arguing that in her engagement with written culture she discovered a desire to experience spiritual comfort and to interact with fellow believers who also sought to live lives of intense emotional...



Meaning and Interpretation
Wittgenstein, Henry James, and Literary Knowledge
Garry L. Hagberg, G. L. Hagberg
'What is the meaning of a word?' In this thought-provoking book, Hagberg demonstrates how this question—which initiated Wittgenstein's later work in the philosophy of language—is significant for our understanding not only of linguistic meaning but of the meaning of works of art and literature as...



The Military Enlightenment
War and Culture in the French Empire from Louis XIV to Napoleon
Christy Pichichero, Christy L. Pichichero
The Military Enlightenment brings to light a radically new narrative both on the Enlightenment and the French armed forces from Louis XIV to Napoleon. Christy Pichichero makes a striking discovery: the Geneva Conventions, post-traumatic stress disorder, the military "band of brothers," and soldierly heroism all found their antecedents in the...



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