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Elizabeth Seton
American Saint
Catherine O'Donnell
In 1975, two centuries after her birth, Pope Paul VI canonized Elizabeth Ann Seton, making her the first saint to be a native-born citizen of the United States in the Roman Catholic Church. Seton came of age in Manhattan as the city and her family struggled to rebuild themselves after the Revolution, explored both contemporary philosophy and...



Brooklyn Before
Photographs, 1971–1983
Before Brooklyn rose to international fame there existed a vibrant borough of neighborhoods rich with connections and traditions. During the 1970s and 1980s, photographer Larry Racioppo, a South Brooklynite with roots three generations deep, recorded Brooklyn on the cusp of being the trendy borough we know today.In Brooklyn Before Racioppo lets...



Borderline Citizens
The United States, Puerto Rico, and the Politics of Colonial Migration
Robert C. McGreevey
Borderline Citizens explores the intersection of U.S. colonial power and Puerto Rican migration. Robert C. McGreevey examines a series of confrontations in the early decades of the twentieth century between colonial migrants seeking work and citizenship in the metropole and various groups—employers, colonial officials, court officers, and labor...



Battling the Buddha of Love
A Cultural Biography of the Greatest Statue Never Built
Jessica Marie Falcone
Battling the Buddha of Love is a work of advocacy anthropology that explores the controversial plans and practices of the Maitreya Project, a transnational Buddhist organization, as it sought to build the "world's tallest statue" as a multi-million-dollar "gift" to India. Hoping to forcibly acquire 750 acres of occupied land for the statue park...



Incidental Archaeologists
French Officers and the Rediscovery of Roman North Africa
Bonnie Effros
In Incidental Archaeologists, Bonnie Effros examines the archaeological contributions of nineteenth-century French military officers, who, raised on classical accounts of warfare and often trained as cartographers, developed an interest in the Roman remains they encountered when commissioned in the colony of Algeria. By linking the study of the...



Transforming the Clunky Organization
Pragmatic Leadership Skills for Breaking Inertia
Samuel B. Bacharach
Organizations, like people, get stuck! They get ensnared in routines and processes, and they fall back into old habits. This is the dangerous period of inertia, the period that precedes failure, when organizations show signs of sluggishness.In Transforming the Clunky Organization Samuel B. Bacharach specifies why organizations fall into...



Migration and Integration in Flanders
Multidisciplinary Perspectives
Across the world, and due to ongoing globalization, migration is increasingly becoming a part of daily life. But more than ever, migration can no longer be viewed as a simple linear trajectory from A to B. The emergence of transnational communities and intense interactions between regions of origin and of destination have led to new forms of...



Traders in Motion
Identities and Contestations in the Vietnamese Marketplace
With essays covering diverse topics, from seafood trade across the Vietnam-China border, to street traders in Hanoi, to gold shops in Ho Chi Minh City, Traders in Motion spans the fields of economic and political anthropology, geography, and sociology to illuminate how Vietnam's rapidly expanding market economy is formed and transformed by...



Grassroots to Global
Broader Impacts of Civic Ecology
Addressing participatory, transdisciplinary approaches to local stewardship of the environment, Grassroots to Global features scholars and stewards exploring the broad impacts of civic engagement with the environment.Chapters focus on questions that include: How might faith-based institutions in Chicago expand the work of church-community...



The Geopolitics of Spectacle
Space, Synecdoche, and the New Capitals of Asia
Natalie Koch
Why do autocrats build spectacular new capital cities? In The Geopolitics of Spectacle, Natalie Koch considers how autocratic rulers use "spectacular" projects to shape state-society relations, but rather than focus on the standard approach—on the project itself—she considers the unspectacular "others." The contrasting views of those from the...



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