Law > Legal History

   
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A Culture of Fact
England, 1550–1720
Barbara J. Shapiro
Barbara J. Shapiro traces the surprising genesis of the "fact," a modern concept that, she convincingly demonstrates, originated not in natural science but in legal discourse. She follows the concept's evolution and diffusion across a variety of...



Quintilian and the Law
The Art of Persuasion in Law and Politics
The purpose of 'Quintilian and the Law' is to reintroduce Quintilian's Institutio oratoria to modern readers, and to show that the topics discussed in it are still very much alive today.



Scandal Nation
Law and Authorship in Britain, 1750–1832
Kathryn Temple
Kathryn Temple argues that eighteenth-century Grub Street scandals involving print piracy, forgery, and copyright violation played a crucial role in the formation of British identity. Britain's expanding print culture demanded new ways of thinking...



Killed Strangely
The Death of Rebecca Cornell
Elaine Forman Crane
"Killed Strangely is an engaging read that will entrance and inform readers who are at once murder mystery and history buffs."—Common-Place



Looking Back at Law's Century
This book describes a century of tremendous legal change, of inspiring legal developments, and profound failures. The twentieth century took the United States from the Progressive Era's optimism about law and social engineering to current concerns...



In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer
The Security Clearance Hearing
At the end of World War II, J. Robert Oppenheimer was one of America's preeminent physicists. For his work as director of the Manhattan Project, he was awarded the Medal for Merit, the highest honor the U.S. government can bestow on a civilian. Yet...



Fighting Faiths
The Abrams Case, The Supreme Court, and Free Speech
Richard Polenberg
Jacob Abrams et al. v. United States is the landmark Supreme Court case in the definition of free speech. Although the 1918 conviction of four Russian Jewish anarchists—for distributing leaflets protesting America's intervention in the Russian...



Consent
Sexual Rights and the Transformation of American Liberalism
Pamela Susan Haag
Whom, over the past two centuries, has society construed as sexual "victims"? Where and when did the notion of consent—so crucial for law and politics today—emerge? In this brilliantly insightful work, Pamela Susan Haag traces the evolution of public...



Negotiating Space
Power, Restraint, and Privileges of Immunity in Early Medieval Europe
Barbara H. Rosenwein
Why did early medieval kings declare certain properties to be immune from the judicial and fiscal encroachments of their own agents? Did weakness compel them to prohibit their agents from entering these properties, as historians have traditionally...



A Companion to Justinian's "Institutes"
The Corpus Iuris Civilis, a distillation of the entire body of Roman law, was directed by the Emperor Justinian and published in a.d. 533. The Institutes, the briefest of the four works that make up the Corpus, is considered to be the cradle of Roman...



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