Law > Legal History

   
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Shifting Landmarks
Property, Proof, and Dispute in Catalonia around the Year 1000
Jeffrey A. Bowman
In a major contribution to the debate among medievalists about the nature of social and political change in Europe around the turn of the millennium, Jeffrey A. Bowman explores how people contended over property during the tenth and eleventh centuries...



Rancor and Reconciliation in Medieval England
Paul R. Hyams
Duels and bloodfeuds have long been regarded as essentially Continental phenomena, counter to the staid and orderly British ways of settling differences. In this surprising work of social and legal history, Paul R. Hyams reveals a post-Conquest...



The Consumption of Justice
Emotions, Publicity, and Legal Culture in Marseille, 1264–1423
Daniel Lord Smail
Drawing on the rich judicial records of Marseille from the years 1264 to 1423, especially records of civil litigation, this book approaches the courts of law from the perspective of the users of the courts.



Brabbling Women
Disorderly Speech and the Law in Early Virginia
Terri L. Snyder
Terri L. Snyder demonstrates how women resisted and challenged oppressive political, legal, and cultural practices in colonial Virginia.



Fama
The Politics of Talk and Reputation in Medieval Europe
In medieval Europe, the word fama denoted both talk (what was commonly said about a person or event) and an individual's ensuing reputation (one's fama). Although talk by others was no doubt often feared, it was also valued and even cultivated as a...



A Culture of Fact
England, 1550–1720
Barbara J. Shapiro
Barbara J. Shapiro traces the surprising genesis of the "fact," a modern concept that, she convincingly demonstrates, originated not in natural science but in legal discourse. She follows the concept's evolution and diffusion across a variety of...



Quintilian and the Law
The Art of Persuasion in Law and Politics
The purpose of 'Quintilian and the Law' is to reintroduce Quintilian's Institutio oratoria to modern readers, and to show that the topics discussed in it are still very much alive today.



Scandal Nation
Law and Authorship in Britain, 1750–1832
Kathryn Temple
Kathryn Temple argues that eighteenth-century Grub Street scandals involving print piracy, forgery, and copyright violation played a crucial role in the formation of British identity. Britain's expanding print culture demanded new ways of thinking...



Killed Strangely
The Death of Rebecca Cornell
Elaine Forman Crane
"Killed Strangely is an engaging read that will entrance and inform readers who are at once murder mystery and history buffs."—Common-Place



Looking Back at Law's Century
This book describes a century of tremendous legal change, of inspiring legal developments, and profound failures. The twentieth century took the United States from the Progressive Era's optimism about law and social engineering to current concerns...



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