Political Science > Political Science / Security Studies

   
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Brutality in an Age of Human Rights
Activism and Counterinsurgency at the End of the British Empire
Brian Drohan
In Brutality in an Age of Human Rights, Brian Drohan demonstrates that British officials’ choices concerning counterinsurgency methods have long been deeply influenced or even redirected by the work of human rights activists. To reveal how that influence was manifested by military policies and practices, Drohan examines three British...



Calculating Credibility
How Leaders Assess Military Threats
Daryl G. Press
Calculating Credibility examines—and ultimately rejects—a fundamental belief held by laypeople and the makers of American foreign policy: the notion that backing down during a crisis reduces a country's future credibility. Fear of diminished...



Causes of War
Power and the Roots of Conflict
Stephen Van Evera
What causes war? How can military conflicts best be prevented? In this book, Stephen Van Evera frames five conditions that increase the risk of interstate war.



The Chemical Weapons Taboo
Richard M. Price
Richard M. Price asks why, among all the ominous technologies of weaponry throughout the history of warfare, chemical weapons carry a special moral stigma. Something more seems to be at work than the predictable resistance people have expressed to any...



China's Ascent
Power, Security, and the Future of International Politics
This book offers multiple analytical perspectives—constructivist, liberal, neorealist—on the significance of the many dimensions of China's regional and global influence and considers the likelihood of conflict or peaceful accommodation.



Chinese Economic Statecraft
Commercial Actors, Grand Strategy, and State Control
William J. Norris
In Chinese Economic Statecraft, William J. Norris introduces an innovative theory that pinpoints how states employ economic tools of national power to pursue their strategic objectives. Norris shows what Chinese economic statecraft is, how it works, and why it is more or less effective.



Constructive Illusions
Misperceiving the Origins of International Cooperation
Eric Grynaviski
Eric Grynaviski challenges this conventional wisdom by arguing that when nations wrongly believe they share a mutual understanding, international cooperation is actually more likely, and more productive, than if they had a genuine understanding of each other's position.



Cooperation under Fire
Anglo-German Restraint during World War II
Jeffrey W. Legro
Legro offers a new understanding of the dynamics of World War II and the sources of international cooperation.



Corporate Warriors
The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry
P.W. Singer
Some have claimed that "War is too important to be left to the generals," but P. W. Singer asks "What about the business executives?" Breaking out of the guns-for-hire mold of traditional mercenaries, corporations now sell skills and services that...



The Covert Sphere
Secrecy, Fiction, and the National Security State
Timothy Melley
Examining how since 1947 a regime of psychological operations and covert action has made the conflation of reality and fiction a central feature of both U.S. foreign policy and American culture.



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