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Burning Bodies
Communities, Eschatology, and the Punishment of Heresy in the Middle Ages
Michael D. Barbezat
Burning Bodies interrogates the ideas that the authors of historical and theological texts in the medieval West associated with the burning alive of Christian heretics. Michael Barbezat traces these instances from the eleventh century until the advent of the internal crusades of the thirteenth century, depicting the exclusionary fires of hell...



The Avars
A Steppe Empire in Central Europe, 567–822
Walter Pohl
The Avars arrived in Europe from the Central Asian steppes in the mid-sixth century CE and dominated much of Central and Eastern Europe for almost 250 years. Fierce warriors and canny power brokers, the Avars were more influential and durable than Attila’s Huns, yet have remained hidden in history. Walter Pohl’s epic narrative, translated into...



American Labyrinth
Intellectual History for Complicated Times
Intellectual history has never been more relevant and more important to public life in the United States. In complicated and confounding times, people look for the principles that drive action and the foundations that support national ideals. American Labyrinth demonstates the power of intellectual history to illuminate our public life and...



War Tourism
Second World War France from Defeat and Occupation to the Creation of Heritage
Bertram M. Gordon
As German troops entered Paris following their victory in June 1940, the American journalist William L. Shirer observed that they carried cameras and behaved as "naïve tourists." One of the first things Hitler did after his victory was to tour occupied Paris, where he was famously photographed in front of the Eiffel Tower.Focusing on tourism by...



Taming Japan's Deflation
The Debate over Unconventional Monetary Policy
Gene Park, Saori Katada, Saori N. Katada, Giacomo Chiozza, Yoshiko Kojo
Bolder economic policy could have addressed bouts of deflation in post-Bubble Japanese history, write Gene Park, Saori N. Katada, Giacomo Chiozza, and Yoshiko Kojo in Taming Japan’s Deflation. Despite warnings from economists, intense political pressure, and "unconventional monetary policy" options to address this problem, Japan’s central bank...



Religion, Colonization and Decolonization in Congo, 1885–1960/Religion, colonisation et décolonisation au Congo, 1885–1960
Religion in today’s Democratic Republic of Congo has many faces: from the overflowing seminaries, the Marian shrines of the Catholic Church, the Islamic brotherhoods, and the Jewish community of Lubumbashi, to the ‘African’ churches of the Congolese diaspora in Brussels and Paris, the healers of Kimbanguism, the televangelism of the booming...



The Perraults
A Family of Letters in Early Modern France
Oded Rabinovitch
In The Perraults, Oded Rabinovitch takes the fascinating eponymous literary and scientific family as an entry point into the complex and rapidly changing world of early modern France. Today, the Perraults are best remembered for their canonical fairy tales, such as "Cinderella" and "Puss in Boots," most often attributed to Charles Perrault, one...



Life Inside the Cloister
Understanding Monastic Architecture—Tradition, Reformation, Adaptive Reuse
Thomas Coomans
Christian monasteries and convents, built throughout Europe for the best part of 1,500 years, are now at a crossroads. This study attempts to understand the sacred architecture of monasteries as a process of the tangible and symbolic organisation of space and time for religious communities. Despite the weight of seemingly immutable monastic...



The Hungry Steppe
Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan
Sarah I. Cameron, Sarah Cameron
The Hungry Steppe examines one of the most heinous crimes of the Stalinist regime, the Kazakh famine of 1930–33. More than 1.5 million people perished in this famine, a quarter of Kazakhstan’s population, and the crisis transformed a territory the size of continental Europe. Yet the story of this famine has remained mostly hidden from...



Empire of Hope
The Sentimental Politics of Japanese Decline
David Leheny
Empire of Hope asks how emotions become meaningful in political life. In a diverse array of cases from recent Japanese history, David Leheny shows how sentimental portrayals of the nation and its global role reflect a durable story of hopefulness about the country’s postwar path. From the medical treatment of conjoined Vietnamese children...



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