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Black Yanks in the Pacific
Race in the Making of American Military Empire after World War II
Michael Cullen Green
By the end of World War II, many black citizens viewed service in the segregated American armed forces with distaste if not disgust. Meanwhile, domestic racism and Jim Crow, ongoing Asian struggles against European colonialism, and prewar calls...



Black Power at Work
Community Control, Affirmative Action, and the Construction Industry
Black Power at Work chronicles the history of direct action campaigns to open up the construction industry to black workers in the 1960s and 1970s, with case studies of Brooklyn, Newark, the Bay Area, Detroit, Chicago, and...



Race and the Modernist Imagination
Urmila Seshagiri
Race has long been recognized as a formative element of American modernism, but its role in England is less clearly understood. While critics have examined race in the works of British writers such as Kipling, Conrad, and Forster, they have done so...



"Brown" in Baltimore
School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism
Howell S. Baum
In the first book to present the history of Baltimore school desegregation, Howell S. Baum shows how good intentions got stuck on what Gunnar Myrdal called the "American Dilemma." Immediately after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, the...



Becoming American under Fire
Irish Americans, African Americans, and the Politics of Citizenship during the Civil War Era
Christian G. Samito
In Becoming American under Fire, Christian G. Samito provides a rich account of how African American and Irish American soldiers influenced the modern vision of national citizenship that developed during the Civil War era. By bearing arms for the...



Caribbean Middlebrow
Leisure Culture and the Middle Class
Belinda Edmondson
It is commonly assumed that Caribbean culture is split into elite highbrow culture—which is considered derivative of Europe and not rooted in the Caribbean—and authentic working-class culture, which is often identified with such iconic island...



A Genealogy of Literary Multiculturalism
Christopher Douglas
Uncovering the unacknowledged role of sociology and anthropology in nourishing the politics and forms of minority writers in America.



Reconstructing the World
Southern Fictions and U.S. Imperialisms, 1898–1976
Harilaos Stecopoulos
"The unending tragedy of Reconstruction," wrote W. E. B. Du Bois, "is the utter inability of the American mind to grasp its... national and worldwide implications." And yet the long shadow of Reconstruction's failure has loomed large in...



The Punished Self
Surviving Slavery in the Colonial South
Alex Bontemps
The Punished Self describes enslavement in the American South during the eighteenth century as a systematic assault on Blacks' sense of self.



A Gift of the Spirit
Reading "The Souls of Black Folk"
Eugene Victor Wolfenstein
In A Gift of the Spirit, Eugene Victor Wolfenstein offers a reading of W. E. B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk aimed at demonstrating its organic unity and coherence. He takes as his interpretive key the experience of the color line with which Du...



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