Social Science > Race and Ethnicity Studies

   
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The Chicken Trail
Following Workers, Migrants, and Corporations across the Americas
Kathleen C. Schwartzman
The Chicken Trail examines the impact of globalization—and of NAFTA in particular—on the North American poultry industry, focusing on the displacement of African American workers in the southeast United States and workers in Mexico.



Civilizing the Margins
Southeast Asian Government Policies for the Development of Minorities
Southeast Asian nations have devised a range of development programs that strive to incorporate minority ethnic groups into the nation-state. The authors of Civilizing the Margins discuss the programs, policies, and laws that affect ethnic minorities...



Class Lives
Stories from across Our Economic Divide
This anthology of narratives dramatizing the lived experience of class in America includes forty original essays from authors who represent a range of classes, genders, races, ethnicities, ages, and occupations across the United States. Together, these essays form a powerful narrative about the experience of...



The Colonial Unconscious
Race and Culture in Interwar France
Elizabeth Ezra
France between the two World Wars was pervaded by representations of its own colonial power, expressed forcefully in the human displays at the expositions coloniales, films starring Josephine Baker, and the short stories of Paul Morand, and...



Creole Crossings
Domestic Fiction and the Reform of Colonial Slavery
Carolyn Vellenga Berman
The character of the Creole woman—the descendant of settlers or slaves brought up on the colonial frontier—is a familiar one in nineteenth-century French, British, and American literature. In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the...



Crossing Broadway
Washington Heights and the Promise of New York City
Robert W. Snyder
Robert W. Snyder's Crossing Broadway tells how disparate groups overcame their mutual suspicions to rehabilitate housing, build new schools, restore parks, and work with the police to bring safety to streets racked by crime and fear. It shows how a neighborhood once nicknamed "Frankfurt on the Hudson" for its large population of German Jews...



Cultural Pluralism and Dilemmas of Justice
Monique Deveaux
How should democratic societies define justice for cultural minority groups, and how might such justice be secured? This book is a nuanced and judicious response to a critical issue in political theory—the challenge of according equal respect...



Dark Vanishings
Discourse on the Extinction of Primitive Races, 1800–1930
Patrick Brantlinger
Brantlinger here examines the commonly held 19th-century view that all "primitive" races around the world were doomed sooner or later to extinction.



Disowning Slavery
Gradual Emancipation and "Race" in New England, 1780–1860
Joanne Pope Melish
Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there. Drawing on a wide array of primary sources—from slaveowners' diaries to children's daybooks to racist broadsides—Joanne Pope...



Dispersing the Ghetto
The Relocation of Jewish Immigrants across America
Jack Glazier
In the early twentieth century, the population of New York City's Lower East Side swelled with the arrival of vast numbers of eastern European Jewish immigrants. The teeming settlement, whose inhabitants faced poverty and frequent...



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