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Out of Oakland
Black Panther Party Internationalism during the Cold War
Sean L. Malloy
In Out of Oakland, Sean L. Malloy explores the evolving internationalism of the Black Panther Party. He traces the shifting intersections between the black freedom struggle in the United States, Third World anticolonialism, and the Cold War.



Heading Out
A History of American Camping
Terence Young
In Heading Out, Young takes the reader out into nature and explores with them the history of camping in the United States. 



For the Common Good
A New History of Higher Education in America
Charles Dorn
In For the Common Good, Charles Dorn challenges the rhetoric of America's so-called crisis in higher education by investigating two centuries of college and university history.



Antifundamentalism in Modern America
David Harrington Watt
David Harrington Watt's Antifundamentalism in Modern America gives us a pathbreaking account of the role that the fear of fundamentalism has played—and continues to play—in American culture.



Whose Detroit?
Politics, Labor, and Race in a Modern American City
Heather Ann Thompson
Heather Ann Thompson focuses in detail on the struggles of Motor City residents during the 1960s and early 1970s and finds that conflict continued to plague the inner city and its workplaces even after Great Society liberals committed themselves to improving conditions.



Who Should Rule at Home?
Confronting the Elite in British New York City
Joyce D. Goodfriend
In Who Should Rule at Home? Joyce D. Goodfriend argues that the high-ranking gentlemen who figure so prominently in most accounts of New York City's evolution from 1664 to 1776 were far from invincible and that the degree of cultural power they held has been exaggerated.



Two Weeks Every Summer
Fresh Air Children and the Problem of Race in America
Tobin Miller Shearer
Two Weeks Every Summer, which is based on extensive oral history interviews with former guests, hosts, and administrators in Fresh Air programs, opens a new chapter in the history of race in the United States.



Architects of Occupation
American Experts and Planning for Postwar Japan
Dayna L. Barnes
In Architects of Occupation, Dayna L. Barnes exposes the wartime origins of occupation policy and broader plans for postwar Japan. She considers the role of presidents, bureaucrats, think tanks, the media, and Congress in policymaking.



Drawing the Lines
Constraints on Partisan Gerrymandering in U.S. Politics
Nicholas R. Seabrook
Drawing the Lines, Nicholas R. Seabrook uses a combination of political science methods and legal studies insights to investigate the effects of redistricting on U.S. House elections. He concludes that partisan gerrymandering poses far less of a threat to democratic accountability than conventional wisdom would suggest. 



Dismantling Solidarity
Capitalist Politics and American Pensions since the New Deal
Michael A. McCarthy
Why has old-age security become less solidaristic and increasingly tied to risky capitalist markets? Drawing on rich archival data that covers more than fifty years of American history, Michael A. McCarthy argues that the critical driver was policymakers' reactions to capitalist crises and their political imperative to promote capitalist growth. 



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