Political Science > Political Science / Foreign Policy

   
<<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 >>>
    sort list by publication date


Black Earth, Red Star
A History of Soviet Security Policy, 1917–1991
R. Craig Nation
R. Craig Nation provides the first post-Cold War history of the Soviets' seventy-five-year struggle to maintain an effective national security policy in a hostile world without altogether abandoning the commitment to their original...



Black Yanks in the Pacific
Race in the Making of American Military Empire after World War II
Michael Cullen Green
By the end of World War II, many black citizens viewed service in the segregated American armed forces with distaste if not disgust. Meanwhile, domestic racism and Jim Crow, ongoing Asian struggles against European colonialism, and prewar calls...



Brothers in Arms
Chinese Aid to the Khmer Rouge, 1975–1979
Andrew C. Mertha, Andrew Mertha
Andrew Mertha traces the surprising lack of influence of China over Cambodia to variations between the Chinese and Cambodian institutions that administered military aid, technology transfer, and international...



Calculating Credibility
How Leaders Assess Military Threats
Daryl G. Press
Calculating Credibility examines—and ultimately rejects—a fundamental belief held by laypeople and the makers of American foreign policy: the notion that backing down during a crisis reduces a country's future credibility. Fear of diminished...



Cauldron of Resistance
Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and 1950s Southern Vietnam
Jessica M. Chapman
In 1955, Ngo Dinh Diem organized an election to depose chief-of-state Bao Dai, after which he proclaimed himself the first president of the newly created Republic of Vietnam. The United States sanctioned the results of this election, which was widely condemned as fraudulent, and provided substantial economic aid and advice to the RVN. Because...



Channels of Power
The UN Security Council and U.S. Statecraft in Iraq
Alexander Thompson
Thompson surveys U.S. policy toward Iraq, starting with the Gulf War, continuing through the interwar years of sanctions and coercive disarmament, and concluding with the 2003 invasion and its long aftermath.



Christian Imperialism
Converting the World in the Early American Republic
Emily Conroy-Krutz
In 1812, eight American missionaries, under the direction of the recently formed American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, sailed from the United States to South Asia. The plans that motivated their voyage were ano less grand than taking part in the Protestant conversion of the entire world. Over the next several decades, these men...



Colonialism and Cold War
The United States and the Struggle for Indonesian Independence, 1945–49
Robert J. McMahon
McMahon looks closely at one area where American diplomacy played an important role in the end of the European imperial order—Indonesia—placing America's later policy in Indochina, in historical context.



Constructive Illusions
Misperceiving the Origins of International Cooperation
Eric Grynaviski
Eric Grynaviski challenges this conventional wisdom by arguing that when nations wrongly believe they share a mutual understanding, international cooperation is actually more likely, and more productive, than if they had a genuine understanding of each other's...



Crude Awakenings
Global Oil Security and American Foreign Policy
Steve A. Yetiv
"The real story of global oil over the past twenty-five years is not about the spillover effects of Palestinians fighting Israelis, or terrorist attacks on U.S. forces in Saudi Arabia and Yemen, or Iraq's stormy relationship with Kuwait. It is...



<<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 >>>

Connect with us

Newsletters