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· Myth and Poetics II

   
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Fictions of Dignity
Embodying Human Rights in World Literature
Elizabeth S. Anker
Elizabeth S. Anker examines human rights in the narrative imagination and, in the process, makes a compelling case for literature as a uniquely valuable point of entry into theoretical discussions of human rights.



The Worlds of Langston Hughes
Modernism and Translation in the Americas
Vera M. Kutzinski
Kutzinski shows that translating and being translated (and often mistranslated) are as vital to Hughes's own poetics as they are to understanding the historical network of cultural relations known as literary modernism.



Gilgamesh among Us
Modern Encounters with the Ancient Epic
Theodore Ziolkowski
In Gilgamesh among Us, Theodore Ziolkowski explores the surprising legacy of the poem and its hero, as well as the epic's continuing influence in modern letters and arts.



The Total Work of Art in European Modernism
David Roberts
Situating the Gesamtkunstwerk at the heart of European modernism.



Benjamin's Library
Modernity, Nation, and the Baroque
Jane O. Newman
Recovering Walter Benjamin's connection to seventeenth-century Baroque literature and political theory.



Bureau of Missing Persons
Writing the Secret Lives of Fathers
Roger J. Porter
Analyzing contemporary narratives of the secret lives led by writers' fathers.



Novel Translations
The European Novel and the German Book, 1680–1730
Bethany Wiggin
Wiggins charts just one of the paths by which newness—in its avatars as fashion, novelties, and the novel—entered the European world in the decades around 1700. As readers across Europe snapped up novels, they domesticated the genre.



Mourning Happiness
Narrative and the Politics of Modernity
Vivasvan Soni
"A work of rare scope and power that grapples with the big questions: Is happiness the proper end of life, as the Greeks conceived it to be, or is life, as it appears since the early English novel, an endless trial?"—Adam Potkay



The Neo-Latin Epigram
A Learned and Witty Genre
The epigram is certainly one of the most intriguing, while at the same time most elusive, genres of Neo-Latin literature. From the end of the fifteenth century, almost every humanist writer who regarded himself a true "poeta" had composed a...



Humanistica Lovaniensia
Journal of Neo-Latin Studies
Volume 58



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