Literature > Literature / Russia and the Former USSR

   
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The Same Solitude
Boris Pasternak and Marina Tsvetaeva
Catherine Ciepiela
"Still, we have the same solitude, the same journeys and searching, and the same favorite turns in the labyrinth of literature and history."—Boris Pasternak to Marina Tsvetaeva One of the most compelling episodes of twentieth-century Russian...



Seeing Chekhov
Life and Art
Michael C. Finke
"Chekhov's keen powers of observation have been remarked by both memoirists who knew him well and scholars who approach him only through the written record and across the distance of many decades. To apprehend Chekhov means seeing how Chekhov sees...



The Five
A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-Century Odessa
Vladimir Jabotinsky
The Five is an captivating novel of the decadent fin-de-siècle written by Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880–1940), a controversial leader in the Zionist movement whose literary talents, until now, have largely gone unrecognized by Western readers.



The Word Made Self
Russian Writings on Language, 1860–1930
Thomas Seifrid
When Osip Mandelstam wrote that the Russian word was "sentient and breathing flesh," he voiced one of the most powerful themes in his culture. In The Word Made Self, Thomas Seifrid explores this Russian fascination with the power of the word as...



Fiction's Overcoat
Russian Literary Culture and the Question of Philosophy
Edith W. Clowes
If Dostoevsky claimed that all Russian writers of his day "came out from Gogol's 'Overcoat,'" then Edith W. Clowes boldly expands his dramatic image to describe the emergence of Russian philosophy out from under the "overcoat" of Russian literature...



Flesh to Metal
Soviet Literature and the Alchemy of Revolution
Rolf Hellebust
"That science-fiction future in which technology would make everything very good—or very bad—has not yet arrived. From our vantage point at least, no age appears to have had a deeper faith in the inevitability and imminence of such a total...



Nabokov at Cornell
Vladimir Nabokov taught at Cornell University from 1948 to 1959. This book examines Nabokov's work and interests durring these years, from his poetry and prose, to criticism of literature and the visual arts, and writings on the humanities and science.



Dostoevsky the Thinker
James P. Scanlan
This book offers the first comprehensive account of Dostoevsky's philosophical outlook. Drawing on the writer's novels and, more so than other scholars, on his essays, letters, and notebooks, Scanlan examines Dostoevsky's beliefs.



Sanin
A Novel
Mikhail Artsybashev
"It evoked almost unprecedented discussions, like those at the time of Turgenev's Fathers and Sons. Some praised the novel far more than it deserved, others complained bitterly that it was a...



Self and Story in Russian History
Russians have often been characterized as people with souls rather than selves. Self and Story in Russian History challenges the portrayal of the Russian character as selfless, self-effacing, or self-torturing by exploring the texts through which...



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