Labor and Workplace Issues > Industrial and Labor Relations

   
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The Supreme Court on Unions
Why Labor Law Is Failing American Workers
Julius G. Getman
In this book, Julius G. Getman argues that while the role of the Supreme Court has become more central in shaping labor law, its opinions betray a profound ignorance of labor relations along with a persisting bias against unions.



From Convergence to Crisis
Labor Markets and the Instability of the Euro
Alison Johnston
What explains Eurozone member-states' divergent exposure to Europe's sovereign debt crisis? Deviating from current fiscal and financial views, From Convergence to Crisis focuses on labor markets in a narrative that distinguishes the winners from the losers in the euro crisis.



Achieving Workers' Rights in the Global Economy
In Achieving Workers' Rights in the Global Economy, Richard P. Appelbaum and Nelson Lichtenstein argue that industrial accidents, low wages, poor working conditions, and voicelessness endemic to the vast majority of workers who labor in the export industries of the global South arise from the very nature of world trade and production.



Running the Rails
Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry
James Wolfinger
n Running the Rails, James Wolfinger uses the history of Philadelphia's sprawling public transportation system to explore how labor relations shifted from the 1880s to the 1960s.



Inequality, Uncertainty, and Opportunity
The Varied and Growing Role of Finance in Labor Relations
Inequality, Uncertainty, and Opportunity provides readers with a sense of the many ways in which financial market developments influence labor and industrial relations.



Building China
Informal Work and the New Precariat
Sarah Swider
In Building China, Sarah Swider draws on her research in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shanghai between 2004 and 2012, including living in an enclave, working on construction jobsites, and interviews with eighty-three migrants, managers, and labor contractors. Her ethnography focuses on the work, family, and social lives of construction workers in China.



If We Can Win Here
The New Front Lines of the Labor Movement
Fran Quigley
In If We Can Win Here, Fran Quigley tells the stories of janitors, fry cooks, and health care aides trying to fight their way to middle-class incomes in Indianapolis. He also chronicles the struggles of the union organizers with whom the workers have made common cause.



The Origins of Right to Work
Antilabor Democracy in Nineteenth-Century Chicago
Cedric de Leon
Cedric de Leon traces the antagonism between pro-business politicians and labor to the Northern victory in the U.S. Civil War, when the political establishment equated collective bargaining with the enslavement of free white men.



Chinese Workers in Comparative Perspective
Anita Chan argues that Chinese labor is too often viewed from a prism of exceptionalism and too rarely examined comparatively, even though valuable insights can be derived by analyzing China’s workforce and labor relations side by side with the systems of other nations.



Working through the Past
Labor and Authoritarian Legacies in Comparative Perspective
The contributors to this volume highlight the critical role that authoritarian legacies play in shaping labor politics in new democracies, providing the first cross-regional analysis of the impact of authoritarianism on labor.



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