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Nation-Empire
Ideology and Rural Youth Mobilization in Japan and Its Colonies
Sayaka Chatani
By the end of World War II, hundreds of thousands of young men in the Japanese colonies, in particular Taiwan and Korea, had expressed their loyalty to the empire by volunteering to join the army. Why and how did so many colonial youth become passionate supporters of Japanese imperial nationalism? And what happened to these youth after the war...



The Migrant Passage
Clandestine Journeys from Central America
Noelle Kateri Brigden
At the crossroads between international relations and anthropology, The Migrant Passage analyzes how people from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala navigate the dangerous and uncertain clandestine journey across Mexico to the United States. However much advance planning they do, they survive the journey through improvisation. Central American...



Imagining World Order
Literature and International Law in Early Modern Europe, 1500–1800
Chenxi Tang
In early modern Europe, international law emerged as a means of governing relations between rapidly consolidating sovereign states, purporting to establish a normative order for the perilous international world. However, it was intrinsically fragile and uncertain, for sovereign states had no acknowledged common authority that would create...



The City Lament
Jerusalem across the Medieval Mediterranean
Tamar M. Boyadjian
Poetic elegies for lost or fallen cities are seemingly as old as cities themselves. In the Judeo-Christian tradition, this genre finds its purest expression in the Book of Lamentations, which mourns the destruction of Jerusalem; in Arabic, this genre is known as the rithā’ al-mudun. The City Lament, Tamar M. Boyadjian traces the trajectory of...



Burning Bodies
Communities, Eschatology, and the Punishment of Heresy in the Middle Ages
Michael D. Barbezat
Burning Bodies interrogates the ideas that the authors of historical and theological texts in the medieval West associated with the burning alive of Christian heretics. Michael Barbezat traces these instances from the eleventh century until the advent of the internal crusades of the thirteenth century, depicting the exclusionary fires of hell...



The Avars
A Steppe Empire in Central Europe, 567–822
Walter Pohl
The Avars arrived in Europe from the Central Asian steppes in the mid-sixth century CE and dominated much of Central and Eastern Europe for almost 250 years. Fierce warriors and canny power brokers, the Avars were more influential and durable than Attila’s Huns, yet have remained hidden in history. Walter Pohl’s epic narrative, translated into...



Taming Japan's Deflation
The Debate over Unconventional Monetary Policy
Gene Park, Saori Katada, Saori N. Katada, Giacomo Chiozza, Yoshiko Kojo
Bolder economic policy could have addressed bouts of deflation in post-Bubble Japanese history, write Gene Park, Saori N. Katada, Giacomo Chiozza, and Yoshiko Kojo in Taming Japan’s Deflation. Despite warnings from economists, intense political pressure, and "unconventional monetary policy" options to address this problem, Japan’s central bank...



Life Inside the Cloister
Understanding Monastic Architecture—Tradition, Reformation, Adaptive Reuse
Thomas Coomans
Christian monasteries and convents, built throughout Europe for the best part of 1,500 years, are now at a crossroads. This study attempts to understand the sacred architecture of monasteries as a process of the tangible and symbolic organisation of space and time for religious communities. Despite the weight of seemingly immutable monastic...



The Hungry Steppe
Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan
Sarah Cameron
The Hungry Steppe examines one of the most heinous crimes of the Stalinist regime, the Kazakh famine of 1930–33. More than 1.5 million people perished in this famine, a quarter of Kazakhstan’s population, and the crisis transformed a territory the size of continental Europe. Yet the story of this famine has remained mostly hidden from...



Empire of Hope
The Sentimental Politics of Japanese Decline
David Leheny
Empire of Hope asks how emotions become meaningful in political life. In a diverse array of cases from recent Japanese history, David Leheny shows how sentimental portrayals of the nation and its global role reflect a durable story of hopefulness about the country’s postwar path. From the medical treatment of conjoined Vietnamese children...



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