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Incidental Archaeologists
French Officers and the Rediscovery of Roman North Africa
Bonnie Effros
In Incidental Archaeologists, Bonnie Effros examines the archaeological contributions of nineteenth-century French military officers, who, raised on classical accounts of warfare and often trained as cartographers, developed an interest in the Roman remains they encountered when commissioned in the colony of Algeria. By linking the study of the...



Design and Politics
The Public Promotion of Industrial Design in Postwar Belgium (1950–1986)
Katarina Serulus
In the postwar era, design became important as a marker of modernity and progress at world fairs and international exhibitions and in the global markets. The Belgian state took a special interest in this vanguard phenomenon of ‘industrial design’ as a vital political and economic strategic tool in the context of the Cold War and the creation of...



14/18—Rupture or Continuity
Belgian Art around World War I
World War I had a major effect on Belgian visual arts. German occupation, the horror at the battlefield and the experience of exile, led to multiple narratives and artistic expressions by Belgian artists during and after the war. Belgian interbellum art is extremely vibrant and diverse. 14/18 – Rupture or Continuity takes a look at Belgian...



Migration and Integration in Flanders
Multidisciplinary Perspectives
Across the world, and due to ongoing globalization, migration is increasingly becoming a part of daily life. But more than ever, migration can no longer be viewed as a simple linear trajectory from A to B. The emergence of transnational communities and intense interactions between regions of origin and of destination have led to new forms of...



Venice's Intimate Empire
Family Life and Scholarship in the Renaissance Mediterranean
Erin Maglaque
Mining private writings and humanist texts, Erin Maglaque explores the lives and careers of two Venetian noblemen, Giovanni Bembo and Pietro Coppo, who were appointed as colonial administrators and governors. In Venice’s Intimate Empire, she uses these two men and their families to showcase the relationship between humanism, empire, and family...



Intimate Violence
Anti-Jewish Pogroms on the Eve of the Holocaust
Jeffrey S. Kopstein, Jason Wittenberg
Why do pogroms occur in some localities and not in others? Jeffrey S. Kopstein and Jason Wittenberg examine a particularly brutal wave of violence that occurred across hundreds of predominantly Polish and Ukrainian communities in the aftermath of the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union. The authors note that while some communities erupted in...



Sexual Politics and Feminist Science
Women Sexologists in Germany, 1900–1933
Kirsten Leng
In Sexual Politics and Feminist Science, Kirsten Leng restores the work of female sexologists to the forefront of the history of sexology. While male researchers who led the practice of early-twentieth-century sexology viewed women and their sexuality as objects to be studied, not as collaborators in scientific investigation, Leng pinpoints...



Rigorism of Truth
"Moses the Egyptian" and Other Writings on Freud and Arendt
Hans Blumenberg
In "Moses the Egyptian"—the centerpiece of Rigorism of Truth, the German philosopher Hans Blumenberg addresses two defining figures in the intellectual history of the twentieth century: Sigmund Freud and Hannah Arendt. Unpublished during his lifetime, this essay analyzes Freud’s Moses and Monotheism (1939) and Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem...



Reflections on Liszt
Alan Walker
"No one knows more about Franz Liszt than Alan Walker."—Malcolm Bowie, Times Literary Supplement In a series of lively essays that tell us much not only about the phenomenon that was Franz Liszt but also about the musical and cultural life...



Universalism and Liberation
Italian Catholic Culture and the Idea of International Community, 1963–1978
Jacopo Cellini
After decades of a problematic, if not plainly hostile, approach to modernity by Catholic culture, the 1960s marked the beginning of a new era. As the Church employed a more positive approach to the world, voices in the Catholic milieu embraced a radical perspective, channeling the need for social justice for the poor and the oppressed. The...



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