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Armed with Expertise
The Militarization of American Social Research during the Cold War
Joy Rohde
During the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon launched a controversial counterinsurgency program called the Human Terrain System. The program embedded social scientists within military units to provide commanders with information about the cultures and grievances of local populations. Yet the controversy it inspired was...



The Taming of Evolution
The Persistence of Nonevolutionary Views in the Study of Humans
Davydd Greenwood
The theory of evolution has clearly altered our views of the biological world, but in the study of human beings, evolutionary and preevolutionary views continue to coexist in a state of perpetual tension. The Taming of Evolution addresses the questions of how and why this is so. Davydd Greenwood offers a sustained critique of the nature/nurture...



Bang Chan
Social History of a Rural Community in Thailand
Lauriston Sharp, Lucien M. Hanks
Bang Chan traces the changing cultural characteristics of a small Siamese village during the century and a quarter from its founding as a wilderness settlement outside Bangkok to its absorption into the urban spread of the Thai capital. Rich in ethnographic detail, the book sums up the major findings of a pioneering interdisciplinary research...



History Is a Contemporary Literature
Manifesto for the Social Sciences
Ivan Jablonka
Ivan Jablonka’s History Is a Contemporary Literature offers highly innovative perspectives on the writing of history, the relationship between literature and the social sciences, and the way that both social-scientific inquiry and literary explorations contribute to our understanding of the world. Jablonka argues that the act and art of...



Harvests, Feasts, and Graves
Postcultural Consciousness in Contemporary Papua New Guinea
Ryan Schram
Ryan Schram explores the experiences of living in intercultural and historical conjunctures among Auhelawa people of Papua New Guinea in Harvests, Feasts, and Graves. In this ethnographic investigation, Schram ponders how Auhelawa question the meaning of social forms and through this questioning seek paths to establish a new sense of their...



Svay
A Khmer Village in Cambodia
May Mayko Ebihara
May Mayko Ebihara (1934–2005) was the first American anthropologist to conduct ethnographic research in Cambodia. Svay provides a remarkably detailed picture of individual villagers and of Khmer social structure and kinship, agriculture, politics, and religion. The world Ebihara described would soon be shattered by Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge. Fifty...



No Path Home
Humanitarian Camps and the Grief of Displacement
Elizabeth Cullen Dunn, Elizabeth C. Dunn
"No Path Home is an extremely interesting, engaging, and well-written book. Elizabeth Cullen Dunn’s fluid and clear prose paints a very evocative picture of life for internally displaced persons as well as presenting a clear theoretical account."—Laura Hammond, SOAS University of London, author of This Place Will Become HomeFor more than 60...



Maid to Order in Hong Kong
Stories of Migrant Workers, Second Edition
Nicole Constable
Middle-class Chinese women in the global city of Hong Kong have entered the workforce in unprecedented numbers over the past three decades, and the demand for foreign domestic workers has soared. A decade ago some foretold the decline in foreign workers and the influx of mainland workers. But today over 120,000 women from the Philippines, over...



Sex, Love, and Migration
Postsocialism, Modernity, and Intimacy from Istanbul to the Arctic
Alexia Bloch
Sex, Love, and Migration goes beyond a common narrative of women’s exploitation as a feature of migration in the early twenty-first century, a story that features young women from poor countries who cross borders to work in low paid and often intimate labor. Alexia Bloch argues that the mobility of women is marked not only by risks but also by...



Working the System
A Political Ethnography of the New Angola
Jon Schubert
Working the System offers key insights into the politics of the everyday in twenty-first-century dominant party and neo-authoritarian regimes in Africa and elsewhere. Detailing the many ways ordinary Angolans fashion their relationships with the system—an emic notion of their current political and socioeconomic environment—Jon Schubert explores...



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