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Limits to Decolonization
Indigeneity, Territory, and Hydrocarbon Politics in the Bolivian Chaco
Penelope Anthias
Penelope Anthias’s Limits to Decolonization addresses one of the most important issues in contemporary indigenous politics: struggles for territory. Based on the experience of thirty-six Guaraní communities in the Bolivian Chaco, Anthias reveals how two decades of indigenous mapping and land titling have failed to reverse a historical...



From Miracle to Mirage
The Making and Unmaking of the Korean Middle Class, 1960-2015
Myungji Yang
Myungji Yang’s From Miracle to Mirage is a critical account of the trajectory of state-sponsored middle-class formation in Korea in the second half of the twentieth century. Yang’s book offers a compelling story of the reality behind the myth of middle-class formation. Capturing the emergence, reproduction, and fragmentation of the Korean...



Undoing Work, Rethinking Community
A Critique of the Social Function of Work
James A. Chamberlain
This revolutionary book presents a new conception of community and the struggle against capitalism. In Undoing Work, Rethinking Community, James A. Chamberlain argues that paid work and the civic duty to perform it substantially undermines freedom and justice. Chamberlain believes that to seize back our time and transform our society, we must...



Svay
A Khmer Village in Cambodia
May Mayko Ebihara
May Mayko Ebihara (1934–2005) was the first American anthropologist to conduct ethnographic research in Cambodia. Svay provides a remarkably detailed picture of individual villagers and of Khmer social structure and kinship, agriculture, politics, and religion. The world Ebihara described would soon be shattered by Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge. Fifty...



Sexual Politics and Feminist Science
Women Sexologists in Germany, 1900–1933
Kirsten Leng
In Sexual Politics and Feminist Science, Kirsten Leng restores the work of female sexologists to the forefront of the history of sexology. While male researchers who led the practice of early-twentieth-century sexology viewed women and their sexuality as objects to be studied, not as collaborators in scientific investigation, Leng pinpoints...



Rare Earth Frontiers
From Terrestrial Subsoils to Lunar Landscapes
Julie Michelle Klinger
Rare Earth Frontiers is a work of human geography that serves to demystify the powerful elements that make possible the miniaturization of electronics, green energy and medical technologies, and essential telecommunications and defense systems. Julie Michelle Klinger draws attention to the fact that the rare earths we rely on most are as common...



No Path Home
Humanitarian Camps and the Grief of Displacement
Elizabeth Cullen Dunn, Elizabeth C. Dunn
"No Path Home is an extremely interesting, engaging, and well-written book. Elizabeth Cullen Dunn’s fluid and clear prose paints a very evocative picture of life for internally displaced persons as well as presenting a clear theoretical account."—Laura Hammond, SOAS University of London, author of This Place Will Become HomeFor more than 60...



Woolf’s Ambiguities
Tonal Modernism, Narrative Strategy, Feminist Precursors
Molly Hite
In a book that comparesVirginia Woolf's writing with that of the novelist, actress, and feminist activist Elizabeth Robins (1862–1952), Molly Hite explores the fascinating connections between Woolf's aversion to women's "pleading a cause" in fiction and her narrative technique of complicating, minimizing, or omitting tonal cues. Hite shows how...



Sex, Love, and Migration
Postsocialism, Modernity, and Intimacy from Istanbul to the Arctic
Alexia Bloch
Sex, Love, and Migration goes beyond a common narrative of women’s exploitation as a feature of migration in the early twenty-first century, a story that features young women from poor countries who cross borders to work in low paid and often intimate labor. Alexia Bloch argues that the mobility of women is marked not only by risks but also by...



Losing Hearts and Minds
American-Iranian Relations and International Education during the Cold War
Matthew K. Shannon
Matthew K. Shannon provides readers with a reminder of a brief and congenial phase of the relationship between the United States and Iran. In Losing Hearts and Minds, Shannon tells the story of an influx of Iranian students to American college campuses between 1950 and 1979 that globalized U.S. institutions of higher education and produced...



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