Law > Legal History

   
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The Politics of Voter Suppression
Defending and Expanding Americans' Right to Vote
Tova Andrea Wang
Tova Wang explains how, across the twentieth century, the issue of access to the ballot was transformed from a largely practical matter of electoral advantage into an ideological difference between the Democrat and Republican Parties.



The Criminalization of Abortion in the West
Its Origins in Medieval Law
Wolfgang P. Müller
Wolfgang P. Müller tells the story of how abortion came to be criminalized in the West. As he shows, criminalization as a distinct phenomenon and abortion as a self-standing criminal category developed in tandem with each other.



Exclusions
Practicing Prejudice in French Law and Medicine, 1920–1945
Julie Fette
Julie Fette shows in Exclusions that doctors and lawyers persuaded the French state to enact exclusionary legislation banning naturalized citizens from careers in law and medicine for up to ten years after they had obtained French nationality.



Witches, Wife Beaters, and Whores
Common Law and Common Folk in Early America
Elaine Forman Crane
In a compelling book full of the extraordinary stories of ordinary people, Elaine Forman Crane reveals the ways in which early Americans clashed with or conformed to the social norms established by the law.



Constitutional Originalism
A Debate
Robert W. Bennett, Lawrence B. Solum
Elucidating the debate between constitutional originalism and the "living constitution" approach.



Political and Legal Perspectives
Political and Legal Perspectives highlights the impact of political change, or "democratization," on religious reform in Northern Europe.



Breaking the Ties That Bound
The Politics of Marital Strife in Late Imperial Russia
Barbara Alpern Engel
New perspectives on marital relations, domesticity, and intimate life in imperial Russia.



"Brown" in Baltimore
School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism
Howell S. Baum
In the first book to present the history of Baltimore school desegregation, Howell S. Baum shows how good intentions got stuck on what Gunnar Myrdal called the "American Dilemma." Immediately after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, the...



War, Revenue, and State Building
Financing the Development of the American State
Sheldon D. Pollack
Pollack shows how war, revenue, and institutional development are inextricably linked in the United States, delineating the mechanisms of political development and revealing the ways in which the United States, too, once was a "developing nation."



Lines of Equity
Literature and the Origins of Law in Later Stuart England
Elliott Visconsi
Confronted by a public that seemed to be sunk in barbarism and violence, English writers including John Milton, John Dryden, and Aphra Behn imagined serious literature as an instrument for change.



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