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· Myth and Poetics II

   
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Bread and Circuses
Theories of Mass Culture As Social Decay
Patrick Brantlinger
Brantlinger shows how the belief in the historical inevitability of social decay—a belief today perpetuated by the mass media themselves—has become the dominant view of mass culture in our time.


"Bread and Circuses is a joy to read. Brantlinger is learned, witty, and, best of all, inviting of conversation."—Voice Literary Supplement



Petrarchism at Work
Contextual Economies in the Age of Shakespeare
William J. Kennedy
Petrarchan" poets were self-consciously aware of themselves as poets—as craftsmen, revisers, and professionals. As William J. Kennedy shows in Petrarchism at Work, this commitment to professionalism and the mastery of poetic craft is essential to understanding Petrarch's legacy.



Surprise
The Poetics of the Unexpected from Milton to Austen
Christopher R. Miller
Christopher R. Miller studies the shift in the cultural meaning of "surprise" in 18th-century England from connoting violent attack to encompassing pleasurable experience, and from external event to internal feeling.



Icelandic Baroque
Poetic Art and Erudition in the Works of Hallgrimur Petursson
Margret Eggertsdottir
Icelandic Baroque seeks to approach the writings of Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), Iceland's leading devotional poet, from a new direction.



Empire of Language
Toward a Critique of (Post)colonial Expression
Laurent Dubreuil
Dubreuil explores the power-language phenomenon in the context of European and, particularly, French colonialism and its aftermath.



History, Literature, Critical Theory
Dominick LaCapra
In this book, Dominick LaCapra continues his exploration of the complex relations between history and literature, considering history as both process and representation.



"That the People Might Live"
Loss and Renewal in Native American Elegy
Arnold Krupat
Krupat surveys the traditions of Native American elegiac expression over several centuries, finding that despite differences of language and culture, death and loss are consistently felt by Native peoples both personally and socially.



Fictions of Dignity
Embodying Human Rights in World Literature
Elizabeth S. Anker
Elizabeth S. Anker examines human rights in the narrative imagination and, in the process, makes a compelling case for literature as a uniquely valuable point of entry into theoretical discussions of human rights.



The Worlds of Langston Hughes
Modernism and Translation in the Americas
Vera M. Kutzinski
Kutzinski shows that translating and being translated (and often mistranslated) are as vital to Hughes's own poetics as they are to understanding the historical network of cultural relations known as literary modernism.



Gilgamesh among Us
Modern Encounters with the Ancient Epic
Theodore Ziolkowski
In Gilgamesh among Us, Theodore Ziolkowski explores the surprising legacy of the poem and its hero, as well as the epic's continuing influence in modern letters and arts.



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