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· Myth and Poetics II

   
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Bread and Circuses
Theories of Mass Culture As Social Decay
Patrick Brantlinger
Lively and well written, Bread and Circuses analyzes theories that have treated mass culture as either a symptom or a cause of social decadence. Discussing many of the most influential and representative theories of mass culture, it ranges widely from Greek and Roman origins, through Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Ortega y Gasset, T. S. Eliot, and the...



Modernism à la Mode
Fashion and the Ends of Literature
Elizabeth M. Sheehan
Modernism à la Mode argues that fashion describes why and how literary modernism matters in its own historical moment and ours. Bringing together texts, textiles, and theories of dress, Elizabeth Sheehan shows that writers, including Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, W.E.B. Du Bois, Nella Larsen, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, turned to fashion to...



Woolf’s Ambiguities
Tonal Modernism, Narrative Strategy, Feminist Precursors
Molly Hite
In a book that compares Virginia Woolf's writing with that of the novelist, actress, and feminist activist Elizabeth Robins (1862–1952), Molly Hite explores the fascinating connections between Woolf's aversion to women's "pleading a cause" in fiction and her narrative technique of complicating, minimizing, or omitting tonal cues. Hite shows how...



Haunting Encounters
The Ethics of Reading across Boundaries of Difference
Joanne Lipson Freed
Acts of cross-cultural reading have ethical consequences. In Haunting Encounters, Joanne Lipson Freed traces the narrative strategies through which certain works of fiction forge connections with their readers across boundaries of difference. Freed uses the idea of haunting—an intense, temporary, and transformative encounter that defies...



Doing Double Dutch
The International Circulation of Literature from the Low Countries
Dutch literature is increasingly understood as a network of texts and poetics connected to other languages and literatures through translations and adaptations. In this book, a team of international researchers explores how Dutch literary texts cross linguistic, historical, geophysical, political, religious, and disciplinary borders, and...



Petrarchism at Work
Contextual Economies in the Age of Shakespeare
William J. Kennedy
Petrarchan poets were self-consciously aware of themselves as poets—as craftsmen, revisers, and professionals. As William J. Kennedy shows in Petrarchism at Work, this commitment to professionalism and the mastery of poetic craft is essential to understanding Petrarch's...



Surprise
The Poetics of the Unexpected from Milton to Austen
Christopher R. Miller
Christopher R. Miller studies the shift in the cultural meaning of "surprise" in 18th-century England from connoting violent attack to encompassing pleasurable experience, and from external event to internal...



Icelandic Baroque
Poetic Art and Erudition in the Works of Hallgrimur Petursson
Margret Eggertsdottir
Icelandic Baroque seeks to approach the writings of Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), Iceland's leading devotional poet, from a new direction.



Empire of Language
Toward a Critique of (Post)colonial Expression
Laurent Dubreuil
Dubreuil explores the power-language phenomenon in the context of European and, particularly, French colonialism and its aftermath.



History, Literature, Critical Theory
Dominick LaCapra
In this book, Dominick LaCapra continues his exploration of the complex relations between history and literature, considering history as both process and representation.



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