Literature > Literature / Russia and the Former USSR

   
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Russian Formalism
A Metapoetics
Peter Steiner
Russian Formalism, one of the twentieth century's most important movements in literary criticism, has received far less attention than most of its rivals. Examining Formalism in light of more recent developments in literary theory, Peter Steiner here offers the most comprehensive critique of Formalism to date. Steiner studies the work of the...



Dostoevsky the Thinker
James P. Scanlan
This book offers the first comprehensive account of Dostoevsky's philosophical outlook. Drawing on the writer's novels and, more so than other scholars, on his essays, letters, and notebooks, Scanlan examines Dostoevsky's beliefs.



Fiction's Overcoat
Russian Literary Culture and the Question of Philosophy
Edith W. Clowes
If Dostoevsky claimed that all Russian writers of his day "came out from Gogol's 'Overcoat,'" then Edith W. Clowes boldly expands his dramatic image to describe the emergence of Russian philosophy out from under the "overcoat" of Russian...



The Five
A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-Century Odessa
Vladimir Jabotinsky
The Five is an captivating novel of the decadent fin-de-siècle written by Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880–1940), a controversial leader in the Zionist movement whose literary talents, until now, have largely gone unrecognized by Western readers.



Flesh to Metal
Soviet Literature and the Alchemy of Revolution
Rolf Hellebust
"That science-fiction future in which technology would make everything very good—or very bad—has not yet arrived. From our vantage point at least, no age appears to have had a deeper faith in the inevitability and imminence of such a...



Heart-Pine Russia
Walking and Writing the Nineteenth-Century Forest
Jane T. Costlow
Costlow explores the central place the forest came to hold in a century of intense seeking for articulations of national and spiritual identity.



In Search of the Free Individual
The History of the Russian-Soviet Soul
Svetlana Alexievich
"I love life in its living form, life that’s found on the street, in human conversations, shouts, and moans." So begins this speech delivered in Russian at Cornell University by Svetlana Alexievich, winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature. In poetic language, Alexievich traces the origins of her deeply affecting blend of journalism, oral...



Murder Most Russian
True Crime and Punishment in Late Imperial Russia
Louise McReynolds
Looking to the trials of infamous murderers in late imperial Russia to reveal its cultural values, social norms, and political expectations.



Nabokov
The Mystery of Literary Structures
Leona Toker
Vladimir Nabokov described the literature course he taught at Cornell as "a kind of detective investigation of the mystery of literary structures." Leona Toker here pursues a similar investigation of the enigmatic structures of Nabokov's own fiction. According to Toker, most previous critics stressed either Nabokov’s concern with form or the...



Nabokov at Cornell
Vladimir Nabokov taught at Cornell University from 1948 to 1959. This book examines Nabokov's work and interests durring these years, from his poetry and prose, to criticism of literature and the visual arts, and writings on the humanities and science.



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