Literature > Literature / Russia and the Former USSR

   
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Russian Formalism
A Metapoetics
Peter Steiner
Russian Formalism, one of this century's most important movements in literary criticism, has received far less attention than most of its rivals. Examining Formalism in light of the most recent developments in literary theory, Peter Steiner here...


"One of the most advanced, sophisticated, and consistently self-reflective works in literary (meta)theory to date—in some respects akin to Hayden White's influential Metahistory, written with comparable verve and panache."—Review in World Literature Today



"Who, What Am I?"
Tolstoy Struggles to Narrate the Self
Irina Paperno
A deeply-informed account of Tolstoy's lifelong attempt to find adequate ways to represent the self, to probe its limits and, ultimately, to arrive at an identity not based on the bodily self and its accumulated life experience.



Murder Most Russian
True Crime and Punishment in Late Imperial Russia
Louise McReynolds
Looking to the trials of infamous murderers in late imperial Russia to reveal its cultural values, social norms, and political expectations.



Heart-Pine Russia
Walking and Writing the Nineteenth-Century Forest
Jane T. Costlow
Costlow explores the central place the forest came to hold in a century of intense seeking for articulations of national and spiritual identity.



Tolstoy On War
Narrative Art and Historical Truth in "War and Peace"
This book brings together a distinguished group of scholars in essays that focus on the wartime sections of War and Peace. Approaching the novel from different disciplines, they wrestle with the book's great themes.



Terror and Greatness
Ivan and Peter as Russian Myths
Kevin M. F. Platt
Exploring historical and cultural representations of the two Russian rulers as they shaped and reflected political shifts.



Russia on the Edge
Imagined Geographies and Post-Soviet Identity
Edith W. Clowes
Through real and imagined geographies, examining post-Soviet debates about what it means to be Russian today.



Nabokov, Perversely
Eric Naiman
Eric Naiman explores the significance and consequences of Nabokov's insistence on bringing the issue of art's essential perversity to the fore, particularly in Lolita, Pnin, Bend Sinister, and Ada.



Stories of the Soviet Experience
Memoirs, Diaries, Dreams
Irina Paperno
Paperno argues that, diverse as they are, these narratives—memoirs, diaries, notes, blogs—assert the historical significance of intimate lives shaped by catastrophic political forces, especially the Terror under Stalin and World War II.



Overkill
Sex and Violence in Contemporary Russian Popular Culture
Eliot Borenstein
Borenstein argues that the popular cultural products consumed in the post-perestroika era were more than just diversions; they allowed Russians to indulge their despair over economic woes and everyday threats.



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