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Russian Formalism
A Metapoetics
Peter Steiner
Russian Formalism, one of this century's most important movements in literary criticism, has received far less attention than most of its rivals. Examining Formalism in light of the most recent developments in literary theory, Peter Steiner here...


"One of the most advanced, sophisticated, and consistently self-reflective works in literary (meta)theory to date—in some respects akin to Hayden White's influential Metahistory, written with comparable verve and panache."—Review in World Literature Today



Adam Mickiewicz
The Life of a Romantic
Roman Koropeckyj
Adam Mickiewicz (1798–1855), Poland's national poet, was one of the extraordinary personalities of the age. In chronicling the events of his life—his travels, numerous loves, a troubled marriage, years spent as a member of a heterodox religious sect...



After Antiquity
Greek Language, Myth, and Metaphor
Margaret Alexiou
With the publication of Ritual Lament in Greek Tradition, widely considered a classic in Modern Greek studies and in collateral fields, Margaret Alexiou established herself as a major intellectual innovator on the interconnections among ancient...



After Lavinia
A Literary History of Premodern Marriage Diplomacy
John Watkins
In medieval and early modern Europe, marriage treaties were a perennial feature of the diplomatic landscape. In After Lavinia, John Watkins traces the history of the practice, focusing on the unusually close relationship between diplomacy and literary production in Western Europe from antiquity through the seventeenth century.



Albert Camus
Elements of a Life
Robert Zaretsky
Like many others of my generation, I first read Camus in high school. I carried him in my backpack while traveling across Europe, I carried him into (and out of) relationships, and I carried him into (and out of) difficult periods of my life. More...



The Allegory of Female Authority
Christine de Pizan's "Cité des Dames"
Maureen Quilligan
The first professional female writer, Christine de Pizan (1363-1431) was widowed at age twenty-five and supported herself and her family by enlisting powerful patrons for her poetry. Her Livre de la Cité des Dames (1405) is the earliest European work...






Baudelaire's World
Rosemary Lloyd
Charles Baudelaire is often regarded as the founder of modernist poetry. Written with clarity and verve, Baudelaire's World provides English-language readers with the biographical, historical, and cultural contexts that will lead to a fuller...



Becoming a Woman in the Age of Letters
Dena Goodman
Over the course of the eighteenth century, increasing numbers of French women, from the wives and daughters of artisans and merchants to countesses and queens, became writers-not authors, and not mere signers of names, but writers of letters. Taking...



The Beggar's Opera
Vaclav Havel
The Czech President Vaclav Havel, a force on behalf of international human rights and his country's most celebrated dissident, first gained prominence as a playwright. During the period when Havel was blacklisted by the Czechoslovakian government for...



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